Thursday, December 27, 2018

Man prosecuted for trafficking ivory items to Thailand


The Hanoi People’s Procuracy has prosecuted a man for attempting to traffic 3.1kg of ivory items to Thailand via Noi Bai International Airport in Hanoi one year ago.

According to the indictment, on December 31, 2017, while completing procedures for passengers boarding a flight from Hanoi to Bangkok, customs officers at the airport suspected and checked the luggage of Quach Van Quynh, who was born in 1997 and from Nhu Thanh district of Thanh Hoa province.

The check found four logs, four bead chains and one ring suspected to be ivory that had a total weight of 3.1kg.

All the items were made from African elephant (Loxodonta Africana) tusks, confirmed the Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources under the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology.

This animal species is listed in the annexes of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

Quynh told investigators he did not own those items, and that he had not known they were ivory as an acquaintance had only asked him to help bring a suitcase containing food and clothes to a person in Thailand.

The procuracy said there are sufficient evidence proving that Quynh knew the suitcase contained ivory but still tried to bring it to Thailand.

Therefore, it decided to prosecute Quynh for “trafficking prohibited items” as regulated in Article 155 of the 1999 Penal Code.

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https://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/society/215077/man-prosecuted-for-trafficking-ivory-items-to-thailand.html

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

Body of missing toddler found in Thai sugarcane plantation


BANGKOK (AP) — The search for a missing 2-year-old boy in which even elephants were employed ended grimly Tuesday with the discovery of the toddler's body in a sugarcane plantation in central Thailand.

Suphan Buri provincial governor Nimit Wanchaithanawong said the boy's body was found around five kilometers (three miles) from where he was last seen, and officials are collecting evidence to determine his cause of death.

Sului Piew, the son of migrant workers from Myanmar, went missing Dec. 17 when he went out to play near the plantation where his parents work. Hundreds of rescuers combed through an 80-acre (32-hectare) field of 2-meter-high (6.6-foot-high) sugarcane plants to search for the child, whose body was finally discovered near a small irrigation stream on the plantation.

Police Col. Ronakorn Prakongsri told television station ThaiPBS that Sului's body was found with injuries on his legs but he added that officers would wait for an autopsy report before they pursued investigating the point. Governor Nimit said the missing boy's family had informed authorities of his disappearance when his 3-year-old friend told her parents that she saw Sului being abducted.

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https://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=12182647

Tuesday, December 25, 2018

Elephants dressed as Santa surprise children at school parade


THAILAND (KTRK) -- In Thailand, four elephants dressed as Santa made a special visit to a school.

They helped hand out toys and snacks to more than 2,000 children.

The kids were then treated to a "khon" mask dancer show, which combines music, singing, dancing and other local rituals.

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https://abc13.com/society/elephants-dressed-as-santa-surprise-children-at-school-parade/4965996/

Elephants help scout vast sugarcane plantations in search for missing 2-year-old boy


Authorities enlisted the help of four elephants in their search for a 2-year-old boy from Burma who has been missing in Thailand for a week.

Sului Piew disappeared from a sugarcane plantation Dec. 17. The boy’s family was alerted of his disappearance when his 3-year-old friend told her parents that she saw the boy being abducted.

“We set up a search operation center near the field and we will continue with the search in full steam,” Nimit Wanchaithanawong, the governor of Suphan Buri province, said. “It's been more than a week and the child is so young. These few days will be very critical to all of us.”

The dragnet for the missing child was launched Wednesday and involved hundreds of volunteers, police officers and soldiers. A team of divers also searched nearby ponds in hopes to find clues.

Police also enlisted the help of mahouts and their elephants to search the large plantation fields because they can sense the presence of life, Laithongrien Meepan, the elephants' owner, said.

“If we find a child, or dogs lying around, they know not to step on that,” Laithongrien said. “Mahouts can look out into the distance and elephants will raise their trunks to smell.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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https://www.foxnews.com/world/elephants-help-scout-vast-sugarcane-plantations-in-search-for-missing-2-year-old-boy

Friday, December 21, 2018

Anantara keeps elephant charity alive


BANGKOK, 21 December 2018: Anantara Hotels and Resorts will launch a new event, a weeklong festival to raise money for Thai National Elephant Day, to replace its elephant polo charity event that has been discontinued.

Last month, the Thailand Elephant Polo Association confirmed it would not seek permission for a 2019 King’s Cup Elephant Polo Tournament in 2019.

The final elephant polo event was hosted by the Anantara Riverside Bangkok Resort, earlier this year, an annual event that over the years has raised more than USD1.5 million to improve the welfare of Thailand’s domesticated elephants.

Replacing the debunked elephant polo event, the new charity project promotes a pre-event stay at Anantara Golden Triangle that overlooks the Mekong River in Chiang Rai province, 13 March 2019.

Guests can interact with domestic elephants in a natural habitat created in the resort’s parkland before moving to Bangkok for the signature event to raise cash for the care of Thai elephants. Staged at Bangkok’s Chao Phraya River, spectators will be able to watch the first ever “elephant boat races” 15 to 17 March.

International teams that usually participate in the age-old cultural tradition of dragon boat racing will paddle what the organisers call “unique elephant themed and designed boats”, creating a colourful sporting event for spectators, while driving fundraising for elephants.

It promises to be an action packed weekend filled out with concerts, food, educational elephant expos, family fun and parties and fireworks all with the goal of fundraising for elephant conservation and welfare.

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https://www.ttrweekly.com/site/2018/12/anantara-keeps-elephant-charity-alive/

Monday, December 17, 2018

UPDATE: THAI ZOO ORDERED TO TEMPORARILY HALT PERFORMANCES FOR EMACIATED ELEPHANTS


The management at Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo in Thailand has been ordered by the country’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation to remove two thin elephants from the park’s performance schedule until their health improves.

Following an outpour of complaints about the emaciated condition of the animals at Samutprakarn, officials examined them on Wednesday, according to spokesperson Sompote Maneerat.

The two elephants who have been removed from the circus-like acts are reportedly underweight because they lost some of their teeth and couldn’t chew food properly, which affected their ability to absorb nutrients — though management has also claimed to keep the animals thin so they’re able to perform dangerous tricks.

To rehabilitate the elephants’ health, the agency recommended that zoo management use pellet and chopped feed. They made the same recommendation for a half-blind horse who was not used in any shows but was found in the same condition as the elephants.

While the physical aspects of the zoo were, shockingly, approved by the inspectors, they suggested ways for the zoo to improve the quality of life of the confined animals, such as chimpanzees and tigers.

The zoo’s license was also out-of-date, the officials discovered. It had expired in April 2016 and the zoo was instructed to submit additional documents upon seeking renewal. However, this has not yet been done.

While we’re happy that the elephants are receiving a much-needed break from performing, we believe that it’s in their best interests to never have to perform again, or endure the decrepit conditions at this zoo, which fails miserably to provide the environment or care that wild animals need.

Lady Freethinker has started a petition campaigning for the elephants to be removed from Samutprakarn and relocated to a sanctuary, where they may live out the rest of their lives in freedom and peace.

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https://ladyfreethinker.org/update-thai-zoo-ordered-halt-performances-emaciated-elephants/

Sunday, December 16, 2018

Record ivory haul in Cambodia lays bare horrible fate of nearly 500 elephants


Cambodia seized more than 3.2 tonnes of elephant tusks hidden in a storage container sent from Mozambique, a customs official said Sunday, marking the country’s largest ivory bust.

The discovery Thursday of 1,026 tusks at the Phnom Penh Autonomous Port followed a tip from the US embassy, the official said, and highlights Cambodia’s emergence as a key regional transit point for the multibillion dollar trade in illicit wildlife.

“The elephant tusks were hidden among marble in a container that was abandoned,” Sun Chhay, director of the Customs and Excise Office at the port, said.

He said the ivory was sent from the southern African nation of Mozambique and arrived at the port last year.

The unidentified owner of the shipment did not arrive to pick up the cargo.

Pictures of the massive haul showed long rows of confiscated tusks spread out on the ground at the port.

Sun Chhay said he did not know whether the shipment was destined for markets in other countries.

Demand from China and Vietnam has fuelled the growth of illegal wildlife trafficking via Cambodia.

Weak law enforcement and corruption attract wildlife smugglers, especially at a time when neighbouring Thailand is cracking down on the banned trade.

Ivory is prized for its beauty while the market in traditional medicine has led to the smuggling of rhino horn and pangolin scales.

Cambodia has a minuscule elephant population but its emergence as a new trafficking hub has resulted in several headline-grabbing busts over the past five years.

The largest before this week occurred in 2014, when Cambodian customs seized about three tonnes of ivory hidden in a container of beans at the southwestern port of Sihanoukville.

Last year, Cambodia also seized nearly a tonne of ivory hidden in hollowed-out logs discovered inside an abandoned container, owned by a company based in Mozambique.

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https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/southeast-asia/article/2178198/record-ivory-haul-cambodia-lays-bare-horrible-fate-nearly

Saturday, December 15, 2018

Wild elephants in Asia have been swallowing plastic trash


Last summer a pilot whale was found dead on a beach in
southern Thailand. The cause of death, it soon transpired, was the large amounts of
plastic waste in its stomach, including 80 plastic bags, that the mammal had accidentally swallowed.

Yet it isn’t just whales and other sea creatures that are affected by the scourge of plastic waste. So too are land animals, like elephants. Wild elephants living in Khao Yai National Park in Thailand, a UNESCO World Heritage site home to some 300 pachyderms, have been swallowing plastic rubbish. We know this because locals discovered plastic shopping bags, bags of chips and other plastic waste in their dung left behind on a local highway. It’s likely that the elephants accidentally swallow plastic wrappings when they go hunting for treats left behind by people at trashcans.

For elephants too ingesting plastic trash can have lethal consequences. Earlier this year a postmortem examination on a 20-year-old female elephant, which was found dead in a forested area in the Indian state of Kerala, showed the pachyderm’s alimentary canal had been blocked with lengthy pieces of plastic. The female jumbo suffered internal bleeding, which led to a failure of her vital organs.

In local forests too plastic waste has been seen in the dung of wild elephants.

India and Thailand are among the world’s largest producers of plastic waste. Thailand alone generates more than 1 million tons of it each year. Measures are underway around the Southeast Asian nation to try and change that. Local retail chains, including Tesco Lotus, have been making efforts, if rather halfheartedly so, to wean shoppers off their prodigious use of disposable plastic bags.

Meanwhile, the country’s National Park Office recently announced a ban on all plastic bags and Styrofoam containers in Thailand’s 154 national parks so as to reduce the amounts of plastic rubbish left behind by visitors.

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https://www.sustainability-times.com/environmental-protection/wild-elephants-in-asia-have-been-swallowing-plastic-trash/

Friday, December 14, 2018

Classical piano soothes old elephants at Thai sanctuary


KANCHANABURI, Thailand: Lam Duan, a 65-year-old, blind Thai elephant is enjoying her lunch, listening to Silent Night being played on a piano.

For eight years, pachyderms like Lam Duan - old, overworked and sometimes disabled - have been rehabilitated with music at Elephants World, a retirement sanctuary for the animals in the western Thai province of Kanchanaburi.

Almost 80 percent of about 3,000 elephants at tourist venues in Thailand, Cambodia, India, Laos, Nepal and Sri Lanka, endure poor living conditions and diets and are overworked, according to the animal welfare group World Animal Protection.

The animals at Elephants World get good food and treatment for their physical ailments, but the music is an extra, special treat they appear to love.

Several times a week, British classical pianist Paul Barton, 57, sets up a piano against a backdrop of forested slopes and plays for his four-legged friends.

“Maybe some of these blind elephants get a little bit of comfort from hearing pieces of soothing classical music occasionally,” says Barton, who studied at London’s Royal Academy of Arts.

Lam Duan approached Barton as he began to play and she appeared to calm down and focus on the music.

At another music session, several elephants seemed to move their heads and move about in front of the piano as the notes flowed.

The owner of the sanctuary, Samart Prasithpol, 44, said the music seemed to provide the elephants with some special comfort.

“We work here to rehabilitate the elephants physically,” Smart told Reuters.

“The use of music has been useful in rehabilitating their soul,” he said.

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https://www.nst.com.my/world/2018/12/440418/classical-piano-soothes-old-elephants-thai-sanctuary

Thursday, December 13, 2018

Plastic waste found in elephant poop at Thai Unesco World Heritage National Park


After numerous stories this year about sea creatures in Thailand dying after swallowing plastic waste, the list of plastic pollution victims appears to have crossed over from water and up onto land this week.

Photos of plastic waste-infused elephant poop in Khao Yai, a national park known as the home of 300 wild elephants, has sparked much criticism among netizens.

In a Facebook post published by user Benchapol Lorsunyaluck on Tuesday, bags of chips and various used plastic goods can be seen clearly inside a large pile of, what Benchapol claims to be, elephant dung on Highway 3077 — the road that cuts through the Unesco World Heritage-listed park.

“Plastic waste … not only turtles, whales, and dolphins eat it,” he wrote in the caption.

While most netizens pointed out how heartbreaking the sight was and agreed with Benchapol’s message about taking better care of the environment, a few other commenters wondered if the elephant “stole” the snacks from the trunks of travellers’ cars.

“There’s probably still a lot of undigested waste stuck in his stomach,” wrote one netizen.

“I saw a clip yesterday of an elephant eating snacks that were left in the back of someone’s truck. He ate a lot of plastic,” wrote another.

Another commenter simply responded with:

Yes, netizen, we completely agree.

In June, Thailand’s National Park Office announced a ban on plastic bags and styrofoam containers in the country’s zoos and 154 national parks in an effort to “beat plastic pollution.”

This incident, however, has got netizens wondering how effective that ban is turning out to be.

Meanwhile, many companies such as Tesco Lotus and 7-Eleven have introduced initiatives to reduce plastic-use but their intentions have also been scrutinized for appearing to be more self-serving than environmental.

Better policies to permanently change the kingdom’s double-bagging habits still remain, indisputably, greatly needed.

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https://coconuts.co/bangkok/news/plastic-waste-found-elephant-poop-thai-unesco-world-heritage-national-park/

Emaciated elephant forced to perform circus tricks in Thai arena


A severely emaciated elephant was forced to perform circus tricks to an almost empty arena at a crocodile farm in Samut Prakan, Thailand on Friday. The female, Asian elephant performed to just a handful of visitors.

According to the Mirror, an anonymous person who stated he had been visiting the zoo for a long time and watching the animals, was very upset after seeing the painfully thin elephant and felt sorry for her.

“I don’t want to say anything bad about the zoo, because there might be problems and cannot afford to look after the elephant. I would like people to help the elephant,” the person stated.

In the video, the elephant balances on two wooden tables and is then led down to walk across a metal tight rope. In the middle of the walk, she stops, turns around and walks back. Clearly, her pelvis and shoulder bones starkly peek out of her skin and has made visitors wonder if the elephant is sick or simply not getting enough food because visitor attendance is so sparse.

The Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo is Thailand’s first crocodile farm caring for more than 60,000 crocodiles used in different daily shows. The other zoo animals add to the shows. At one time the zoo was very popular, but it seems to have lost its appeal, although a spokesperson for the zoo has insisted the elephants are “good” and they do shows every day.

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https://petrescuereport.com/2018/emaciated-elephant-forced-to-perform-circus-tricks-in-thai-arena/

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

When an elephant searched a truck | Aisa Bhi Hota Hai | ABP News Videos


An elephant is seen searching a truck. The mammal take out all the bags and baskets from the truck and then moves away. The incident is of Thailand and the elephant was hungry

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https://www.abplive.in/videos/when-an-elephant-searched-a-truck-aisa-bhi-hota-hai-875407

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Hungry elephant forces traffic to stop before rummaging through the vehicles with its trunk and plundering food


A hungry elephant was filmed rummaging through pick-up trucks in the hope of scavenging food.

Drivers and passengers along the stretch of road though the Khao Yai National Park in Thailand were stunned when the elephant started to remove items from the trucks using his trunk.

Vehicles along the road stopped still during the incident on December 9 as they tried not to disturb the creature.

One of the men in the vehicle said: 'I pray that they don't attack the car … Once he gets food he will leave.'

The elephant is seen picking up lots of inedible items, including a plastic bottle which he then spits out.

Throwing the large containers onto the floor in his hunt for food, the tusker finally manages to find uncooked rice which he stuffs into his mouth.

A man inside the vehicle from where the footage is being films asks the other passengers whether they should drive away as the animal begins to approach their truck.

One of the women inside disagrees and urges people to stay, with the elephant making his way over to their vehicle to rummage at the back of their truck.

The couple could be heard telling two of their children sitting in the back of the truck to keep quiet to avoid an imminent attack from the animal.

Luckily for all involved, the elephant does not cause them any harm they are able to drive away safely.

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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6483061/Hungry-elephant-forces-traffic-stop-rummaging-food.html

Monday, December 10, 2018

Severely Underweight Elephant Forced To Perform Circus Tricks


Footage of a painfully thin elephant being forced to perform circus tricks in Thailand has gone viral.

A ridiculously underweight cow elephant was made to walk a tight rope and perform in front of a practically deserted stand at the Samut Prakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo.

Spectators who were there looked on in horror as the elephant was forced to perform, despite such her skeletal frame.

One person, who,wished to remain anonymous, had attended the zoo and said they were utterly shaken by the harrowing sight.

They said: "I've been visiting the zoo for a long time because I like to look at the animals. But when I visited last week I was upset when I saw one of the elephants. The elephant looked so thin and weak. I felt so sorry for him. I think he needs help.

"I don't want to say anything bad about the zoo, because they might be problems and cannot afford to look after the elephant. I would like people to help the elephant."

The crocodile farm was built in 1950 as Thailand's first crocodile farm, but quickly grew in size - it is now home to more than 60,000 crocodiles.

Residents local to the farm said it was once a popular attraction, however this has decreased over the years.

A 24-year-old resident who lives nearby, called Ploy, said: ''I was born on the same street as the zoo and it has been open all my life. I first went when I was 10 years old but haven't been back since. It used to be very popular and there would be lots of tour buses arrives, but now it's so quiet. I'm worried about the animals.''

The zoo has responded to accusations of cruelty - a spokesperson for the zoo said today that the elephants at the park are not suffering from any health issues, saying: ''No, no, no. The elephants here are all healthy. They are all good. None of them are thin. They are all fed well. They do shows every day.''

The average Asian Elephant should be sitting at a healthy weight of anywhere between 2,700kg and 5,400kg. It has been suggested that the elephant in the footage shows signs of malnourishment as its ribs and pelvis are clearly visible.

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http://www.ladbible.com/news/animals-severely-underweight-elephant-forced-to-perform-circus-tricks-20181210

Tragic case of 'thin and weak' elephant performing circus tricks to empty zoo in Thailand


Rumble

Harrowing footage shows an apparently underweight elephant performing tricks inside an empty zoo.

The adult female elephant with long white tusks was performing in front of a virtually deserted stand at a crocodile farm attraction. With its bones visible, the "cow" can be seen balancing on two wooden tables before being led down and then walking across a metal tightrope. It pauses in the middle, turns around and walks back.

The skeletal frame of the Asian elephant - with its pelvis and shoulder poking through its saggy leathery skin - raised concerns from one visitor who was attending the Samutprakarn Crocodile Farm and Zoo.

The filmer, who wished to remain anonymous, said: ''I've been visiting the zoo for a long time because I like to look at the animals. But when I visited last week I was upset when I saw one of the elephants. The elephant looked so thin and weak. I felt so sorry for him. I think he needs help. I don't want to say anything bad about the zoo, because they might be problems and cannot afford to look after the elephant. I would like people to help the elephant.''

A spokesman for the zoo said that all the elephants are ''good.'' They said: ''The elephants here are all healthy. They are all good. None of them are thin. They are all fed well. They do shows every day.''

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https://rumble.com/v6udz7-tragic-case-of-and-aposthin-and-weak-and-apos-elephant-performing-circus-tr.html

Thursday, December 06, 2018

First ever ‘Elephant Travel Mart 2018’ to promote ecotourism in Thailand


A new ecotourism event, Elephant Travel Mart 2018, jointly hosted by ‘Save Elephant Foundation’ and ‘Asian Elephant Projects’, aims to bring together ethical elephant tour operators and tour agencies in Chiang Mai on December 14.

The event, taking place at Khum Kan Toke, Chiang Mai, is conceived by the founder of ‘Save Elephant Foundation’, Sangduen Chailert (Lek), who works tirelessly for the wellbeing of Thailand’s elephants.

Elephant tourism has long been associated with Thailand by travelers from around the globe and helps to attract millions of visitors to the country each year. However, there has been a growing trend away from traditional forms of elephant tourism (such as elephant riding and circus shows) towards ethical elephant tours offering programs that are sustainable and make the well-being of elephants a priority.

Ecotourism values promoting modes of travel with minimal impact on the environment are becoming more widespread, particularly among young people. A growing concern for the environment and for the welfare of animals is changing the landscape of tourism across many tourist destinations throughout the world – a positive change that presents significant opportunities.

A key goal of Elephant Travel Mart 2018 is to provide a venue to bring people together to discuss how the travel industry can continue to adapt to respond to this trend and better meet the shifting demands of travelers.

Lek Chailert suggests that, “If ethical tour operators using environmentally sound practices and tour agencies work together in response to the demand for sustainable ecotourism in Thailand, a mutually beneficial relationship can be achieved that will create widespread benefits for the elephants, the environment, small communities, and the Thai economy.”

The event will begin with a thank you address to the audience by Lek, followed by an opening ceremony, including a performance by the Chiang Mai College of Dramatic Arts. Elephant tour operators and travel agencies will then meet to discuss potential opportunities for working together.

At the event, there will be 30 booths representing the ‘Saddle Off’ projects promoted by Asian Elephant Projects. Each booth will provide details about their project and hand out brochures and souvenirs to visitors. There will also be lucky draw prizes offering free gift vouchers to visit the various ‘Saddle Off’ projects throughout Chiang Mai province.

In the evening, dinner will be served and entertainment provided by various Thai stars including Rose Sirinthip, Baitoey R-SIAM, King The Star, and Bow Benjasiri. The winners of the lucky prize draw will then be announced. The event will end with a closing address by Prof. Prayat Vorapreecha, Honorary Counselor of Save Elephant Foundation.

It is hoped that this event will provide an important opportunity to exchange and develop ideas as well as build relationships between members of the travel industry in order to take full advantage of the growing popularity of ecotourism.

“The success of this event holds the potential to positively impact the welfare of elephants in Thailand, protect and improve the environment, and provide support to local communities,” concludes Ms. Chailert.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://thethaiger.com/news/chiang-mai/first-ever-elephant-travel-mart-2018-to-promote-ecotourism-in-thailand

Wednesday, December 05, 2018

Khao Yai warns against elephant peril


Khao Yai National Park has instructed tourists on how not to anger wild elephants walking beside its roads.

Tourists travelling to the national park from Prachin Buri Province at the Noen Hom entrance are likely to meet wild elephants in the morning and evening, the national park said.

They are likely to encounter an elephant or a herd from the km4 marker all the way to the Haew Narok Waterfall.

In order not to anger them, tourists must not use the horn, make loud noises or use a flash when taking photos, the park ranger warned.

Drivers should maintain a 30-metre distance and keep their engine running so they can retreat if an elephant approaches. Headlights should be used at night.

“Don’t get out of the vehicle and go near the animal to take photos,” the ranger added.

Khao Yai spans over 2,168 square metres in four provinces: Nakhon Ratchasima, Saraburi, Prachin Buri and Nakhon Nayok. The third largest Thai national park is home to about 300 wild elephants and is renowned as one of the best places to see wild elephants in Thailand.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1071824-khao-yai-warns-against-elephant-peril/

Khao Yai warns against elephant peril


Khao Yai National Park has instructed tourists on how not to anger wild elephants walking beside its roads.

Tourists travelling to the national park from Prachin Buri Province at the Noen Hom entrance are likely to meet wild elephants in the morning and evening, the national park said.

They are likely to encounter an elephant or a herd from the km4 marker all the way to the Haew Narok Waterfall.

In order not to anger them, tourists must not use the horn, make loud noises or use a flash when taking photos, the park ranger warned.

Drivers should maintain a 30-metre distance and keep their engine running so they can retreat if an elephant approaches. Headlights should be used at night.

“Don’t get out of the vehicle and go near the animal to take photos,” the ranger added.

Khao Yai spans over 2,168 square metres in four provinces: Nakhon Ratchasima, Saraburi, Prachin Buri and Nakhon Nayok. The third largest Thai national park is home to about 300 wild elephants and is renowned as one of the best places to see wild elephants in Thailand.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1071824-khao-yai-warns-against-elephant-peril/

Ethical tourist wildlife experiences: Seven animal experiences tourists should never do


I rode an elephant in Thailand a decade ago. It was part of a trip with Intrepid, well regarded for its "responsible travel" approach, yet the way the animal was repeatedly struck on the head with a heavy metal hook made me uneasy.

When Intrepid became one of the first tourism businesses to remove elephant rides from their offerings in 2014, the extent of the cruelty behind such elephant experiences became apparent.

A study commissioned by the company revealed that elephants were taken from the wild as babies, inhumanely broken in, trained, confined and coerced so they would behave in unnatural ways, day in, day out.

There's a "wildlife tourism paradox", according to World Animal Protection's (WAP) Australian campaign manager, Ben Pearson.

"People who love wild animals will go to these venues ... to see them perform, to ride them, get in a pool with a dolphin or have a selfie with a tiger, but what they don't realise is that those animals ... are being treated very cruelly."

Consider the ethics of these 7 kinds of wildlife tourism.

Elephant experiences

Where: India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Bali

According to a 2017 WAP report, of the 2923 elephants in 220 Asian tourist venues assessed, three-quarters lived in unacceptable conditions. This included being chained day and night, often with chains of less than three metres.

Shows requiring elephants to perform tricks like standing on their hind legs hide cruel training and punishment, but so do seemingly benign activities like painting – a delicate, unnatural task for these large animals. Even being bathed by tourists is stressful. Against their instincts, they are surrounded, touched and splashed in the face, probably repeatedly each day.

Interacting with apex predators

Where: Thailand, southern Africa

Some gloss has worn off tiger selfies recently as guys on Tinder posing with Tigger were shamed, and Thailand's controversial Tiger Temple shut down. It's reportedly reopening as a zoo, however, and numerous other tiger parks continue operating around the country, attracting bus loads of tourists who pat, prod and take photos with juveniles and adults. There's also an emerging trend of petting and walking with captive lions in several African nations.

Such interaction with humans is unnatural for apex predators, so various methods are used to keep things relatively safe. Cubs are taken from their mothers after a few weeks and hand-reared to subdue their instincts. They are often confined in cages or pens when not on show, and tiger parks have also been accused of routinely sedating animals.

Holding wild animals

Where: Widespread

It's difficult to resist our natural urge to cuddle cute little creatures. Now there's the added temptation of selfies for social-media success, holding animals is a booming tourism trend.

In countries with little or no regulation, baby animals are often taken from the wild, including threatened species. Whatever their origin, they are subjected to some form of cruelty, from continuous daily handling to beatings. According to WAP, the Amazon's baby sloth selfie props live for only six months, but up to 30 years in the wild.

Wild animal shows

Where: Widespread

While circuses featuring wild animals are now rare in many countries they are thriving in places such as Russia, and other entertainment like dancing monkeys and dolphin shows are also commonplace. Making wild animals perform unnatural tricks requires some kind of coercion, and they are usually confined in small spaces when not training or performing.

Even more questionable is forcing animals to fight as entertainment, including orangutan kick-boxing, and crocodile and alligator wrestling.

Swimming with captive dolphins

Where: United States, Mexico, the Caribbean

Dolphin shows have been losing favour as these captive mammals live extremely unnatural lives.

That includes dolphins swimming with humans in shallow pools (or small, often polluted sea pens), towing visitors by their fins, giving kisses and being repeatedly touched. Trained through the denial of food, these seemingly smiley-faced creatures spend much of their time in crowded, chemically treated holding tanks.

Wild animal souvenirs

Where: Widespread

Tourists may avoid ivory, knowing its illegal trade means elephants are often killed for their tusks alone. However, countless other sorts of souvenirs are made from wild-animal parts, such as fur, teeth, horns, skins, feathers and tortoiseshell, and it's often impossible to know whether they were sourced ethically.

Many animals, including endangered species, are inhumanely trapped, hunted, farmed and slaughtered for souvenirs. Some are harvested on an industrial scale then sold onto local craftspeople, giving tourists the impression they are buying sustainable products. So, far from having been collected on the beach, that seashell is probably one of millions scooped from the deep – with living mollusc still inside – solely for decoration.

Eating wild animals

Where: Widespread, especially Africa and Asia

From kangaroos to frogs legs, wild animals are eaten everywhere, but in many places the way they are harvested is unrestricted or poorly policed. So while it's good to try local foods, consider that inhumane processes may be behind them, and the critter on your plate could be endangered.

"Bushmeat" is a common term for the flesh of wild land animals in tropical regions, especially Africa, where eating species such as gorillas has long exceeded sustainable subsistence. In Asia, sharks are thrown back into the sea after their fins are removed for shark fin soup, and demand for Chinese medicines with wild-animal ingredients is rising. Among the most popular is tiger wine, a purported aphrodisiac made using tiger bones.

So what wildlife tourism experiences are ethical?

The best option is to see animals in their natural habitat, from polar bears in Canada to big cats in Kenya. Or visit genuine wildlife reserves and sanctuaries, where animals can roam freely and are rescued rather than bred in captivity.

Warning signs to watch for:

- Restricted movement. Obvious signs are short, tight chains and ropes, but also look for animals in confined spaces, including cages, when not working.

- Inadequate shelter. Are they exposed to the elements, including hot sun?

- Inadequate food or water. Do they seem thirsty or malnourished? Do they have access to clean water?

- Is it natural behaviour? If an animal wouldn't do this in the wild, coercion is involved.

- Handlers beating, whipping or using other harsh physical coercion.

- Indications of distress, exhaustion, injury, disease or sedation.

- Filed or pulled teeth and claws.

- Frequent exposure to people, noise and flash photography.

- Many young animals. This is an indication of captive breeding for profit rather than conservation, or that animals are disposed of when no longer cute or manageable.

- Do some research. Does the venue or tour operator have an animal welfare policy? Are there any reviews online suggesting animal cruelty?

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https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/news/109081631/ethical-tourist-wildlife-experiences-seven-animal-experiences-tourists-should-never-do

Buddhist monks and elephants mark Thailand's Fathers Day


Description

Elephants give Buddhist monks offerings to mark Thailand's father's day yesterday at the Nong Nooch Tropical Botanical Garden in Pattaya.

Footage shows the elephants picking up the traditional 'alms' in their trunks and handing them over to the religious figures. The ceremony is a way to give thanks to their former king Bhumibol Adulyadej , who passed away in October 2016, and honour their own relatives on Father's Day.

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https://www.newsflare.com/video/261562/animals/buddhist-monks-and-elephants-mark-thailands-fathers-day

Monday, December 03, 2018

Thailand: Driver dies after a crash with an elephant


A driver was killed when his pickup truck crashed into an elephant on a dark forest road in northeastern Thailand, reports said on Thursday.

According to reports, the speeding driver’s vehicle was hit by a wild elephant in Khao Yai National Park in north-eastern Thailand’s Nakhon Ratchasima Province on Wednesday evening.

The driver died at the scene. Rescuers found his badly-destroyed vehicle and used an iron cutter to remove the 58-year-old driver’s body that trapped behind the wheel.

Witnesses said two elephants were crossing the road when the accident happened. They waved at the driver to warn him to keep away from the animals but it was too dark for him to see it.

Officials from the national park and police tracked down the elephant involved in the crash and found it has injuries on its legs. They kept a close watch on the elephant overnight.

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https://www.newsghana.com.gh/thailand-driver-dies-after-a-crash-with-an-elephant/

Saturday, December 01, 2018

Man Killed by Elephant While Driving Near Thai National Park


A man was killed by an elephant in northeastern Thailand while driving last Wednesday.

Police Lt. Col. Kemchat Paedkaew said that the man was driving near Khao Yai National Park when the elephant appeared on the road. Allegedly, wild animals have strayed from the park in the past.

While there are signs warning drivers to beware of wild animals on the road, the man’s car was speeding and hadn’t slowed down when the elephant was encountered, causing the car to hit the elephant. When the animal and car collided, the elephant responded by stomping on the vehicle, ultimately killing the driver. The elephant has since been guided back to the park and is being examined.

According to Lt. Paedkaew, up to two people each year are killed by elephants in areas surrounding the park.

Cases like this remind us that it’s always important to be aware of your surroundings (especially in unfamiliar places), to pay attention to surrounding signage, and to always give animals their due space. As nice as they may seem, animals can be unpredictable. In fact, TPG has reported on similar stories recently in which animals felt threatened and became dangerous to those nearby, such as the incident of the charging bison at Yellowstone.

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https://thepointsguy.com/news/man-killed-by-elephant-while-driving-in-thailand/

Friday, November 30, 2018

Driver dies in crash with wild elephant in Thailand’s national park


BANGKOK (Bernama) – A motorist was killed when his pick-up truck crashed into one of two wild elephants on a dark forest road in northeastern Thailand, reports said yesterday.

According to reports, the speeding driver’s vehicle was hit by the pachyderm in Khao Yai National Park in northeastern Thailand’s Nakhon Ratchasima Province on Wednesday evening.

Xinhua news agency reported the 59-year-old driver was killed on the spot. Rescuers used an iron cutter to extricate the body from the badly-wrecked vehicle. Witnesses said two elephants were crossing the road when the accident occurred.

They waved at the driver to warn him to keep away from the animals but it was too dark for him to notice the witnesses.

Officials from the national park and police tracked down the elephant involved in the crash and found it had sustained injuries on the legs.

They kept a close watch on the elephant overnight.

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https://borneobulletin.com.bn/driver-dies-in-crash-with-wild-elephant-in-thailands-national-park/

Thursday, November 29, 2018

Elephant stomps driver to death after car hits its legs in Thailand


BANGKOK — A man was killed by a wild elephant after his speeding car hit the animal near a national park in northeastern Thailand, police said Thursday.

Police Lt. Col. Kemchat Paedkaew said the accident occurred at dusk Wednesday on a small road that has signs telling drivers to beware of wild animals that sometimes stray from Khao Yai National Park.

“Elephants don’t come out during the day but they start coming out when it gets dark,” Kemchat said.

He said the driver was not from the area and failed to slow down when he encountered the elephant. When the vehicle struck the elephant’s back legs, the animal responded by stomping on the car, destroying the engine and killing the driver.

Kemchat says up to two people are killed by elephants each year in areas surrounding the park. The elephant struck in the crash was guided back into the park and is being looked after by officials there, he said.

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https://edmontonsun.com/news/world/elephant-fatally-stomps-driver-after-car-hit-its-legs-in-thailand/wcm/1efe0b9e-4e6d-425c-8299-dd437c784ec9

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Wild elephants kill official in Chachoengsao


A wildlife official in Chachoengsao, east of Bangkok, has been found dead after being kicked and dragged by wild elephants.

Officials at the Khao Ang Rue Nai Wildlife Sanctuary in Sanam Chai Khet district revealed that one of their colleagues was found dead at 6am yesterday morning. The victim, 46 year old Manop Karasuk, was on the Monday night shift to watch out for wild elephants.

Manop was found about 100 metres away from his watch post where he was stationed and tasked with preventing them from leaving the wildlife sanctuary. There were signs that his body was kicked and dragged along the ground.

The officials said there are about 30 wild elephants in the area and they often came out at night to eat the crops of villagers. Officials were taking turn to guard the spot and to try and frighten them into retreating back to the forest.

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https://thethaiger.com/news/bangkok/wild-elephants-kill-official-in-chachoengsao

Monday, November 26, 2018

Essay topics: The graph shows the information the populations of Asian elephants between 1994 and 2007.


The column chart illustrates the information about that the compare the estimated population of nine Asian countries(Vietnam, India, Malay, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and China) from 1994 to 2007.

A quick look on graph is enough to make it clear that one of the country in Cambodia where population of elephants had increased as compared to others eight Asian countries the number of elephants were showed to downward trend, over given period of time.

To commence with, India was the highest where population of elephants in 1994 reached to peak point approximately 10000 while, in this year others two nations in Myanmar and Thailand but, Myanmar was the second largest and the figure for elephants population at more than 5000 whereas, the populations of Asian elephants in Thailand was slightly fell down under 4000, respectively. Subsequently, others six nations where the number of elephants were showed to remained stable nearby 3000.

However, in 2004 the populations of elephants in China at less than as compared to others eight countries which account for 500. Whereas, four Asian nations( Vietnam, Malaysia, srilanka and Thailand) where the proportion of the elephants were represented to remained stable just above 3000. Finally, the figure for elephants in India and Myanmar in 2004 minimally dropped to 7200 and 4800.

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https://www.testbig.com/ielts-writing-task-i-ielts-academic-essays/graph-shows-information-populations-asian-elephants

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Elephants hold up street traffic in Ayutthaya, Thailand.


Description

These elephants take tourists on sight seeing trips at Ayutthaya, Thailand, and hold up traffic as they cross the street.

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https://www.newsflare.com/video/261843/animals/elephants-hold-up-street-traffic-in-ayutthaya-thailand

Friday, November 23, 2018

Tourists feed elephants in Surin


Surin – Thai and foreign tourists in Surin Province fed more than 160 elephants, buffet-style, with tons of food that came in various kinds last week.

Surin Governor Praphassorn Malakarn ceremonially led a procession of elephants from the back of Surin Train Station through the heart of the city into the area of Phraya Surin Phakdi Si Narong Changwang Monument in Surin Province.

The governor was dressed as a warlord riding an elephant and the procession included more than 160 elephants in beautiful attire along with the world’s first pair of twin elephants.

The governor opened the elephants’ feast, which was held in gratitude for the elephants that traveled to perform in the elephant fair and the Red Cross fair the following day.

Besides recompensing the elephants, this annual practice in the city of elephants, is also to promote native artistic and cultural traditions and preserve elephant performances, the elephant being a symbolic animal of Thailand.

At this time of year, a large number of Thai and foreign tourists come to feed the elephants and ride them to tour the city. As for this year, although there were fewer elephants than last year, there was as much as 50 tons of food consisting of vegetables and fruits.

The buffet feast table was over 400 meters long, making it the longest and biggest elephant-feeding table in the world.

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https://www.pattayamail.com/travel/tourists-feed-elephants-surin-234141

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Elephants fight back to Thailand before preparing for a meeting with Singapore – innnews


At 18.00 hrs at Suvarnabhumi International Airport on 22 November 2018, Thai national team head coach Milo Raya Yeev led the elephant hunters in the Philippines. Back to Thailand It's All Right After completing the mission in the 2018 ASEAN Championship Match 3 of Group B
by Elephant War, the warlord, the Aztec 1-1 over, fell by. Before today Return immediately to Thailand. The current situation is to lead the national team with 7 points from 3 games the mass of Group B, but must enter the semi-finals.

The Thai national team will return to rehearsals on the evening of November 23 as a rehearsal for the media. And visit outsiders To open the house to meet. Singapore National Team In the 2018 ASEAN Championship Final of Group B. On November 25, 2561 at 19.00 at the Rajamangala Stadium. Live on HD channel 7 and Bugaboo TV. Thaiticketmajor http://bit.ly/AFFTHA

The Thai national team has a good record. Singapore National Team In the ASEAN Championship the last 8 wins have won 4, 2 and lost two important games in the last 3 games. It's a win for every shot. From the final of the second game in 2012, the home win 1-0, the group stage wins in 2014 and 2016 with 2: 1 and 1: 0, respectively.

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https://newsbeezer.com/thailandeng/elephants-fight-back-to-thailand-before-preparing-for-a-meeting-with-singapore-innnews/

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Elephant sanctuary attractions may not be as ethical as they seem

As travelers become more conscientious, traditional animal attractions are increasingly being rejected. These attractions are being replaced with voluntourism and animal sanctuary experiences. While these experiences appeal to ethical tourists, they can be crueler than they seem.

There has been a clear shift in the way people interact with captive wild animals in recent years. While circuses used to be a grand spectacle, a 2015 Gallup poll showed that 69% of Americans are concerned with how animals are treated in the circus. Just last year, Ringling Bros. Circus closed their show after 146 years. Americans also showed high levels of concern with other animal attractions such as animal sports and contests, aquariums and zoos.

Travelers now want to visit wild animals in a more natural and humane setting. This new wave of animal tourism provides travelers with a feel-good experience, but these experiences can be marked by the same inhumane conditions as traditional animal attractions.

The elephant camps throughout Thailand, which offer travelers the opportunity to ride, bathe and watch elephants, are a prime example of this phenomenon.

Elephant camps came to rise after commercial logging was banned in Thailand in 1989. Elephants in the country had been trained to work in the logging industry transporting people and logs. The ban left many captive elephants displaced as they could no longer work but were too accustomed to people to be released into the wild. Many elephant handlers turned towards the tourism industry. There are now an estimated 200 elephant camps in Thailand alone.

While many of the elephants at the camps came from the logging industry, some have been captured from the wild. A 2014 report by the wildlife trade monitoring group TRAFFIC found that an estimated 79 to 81 wild elephants were illegally captured for sale into the tourism industry in Thailand during a two-year period.

Today, Thailand is home to fewer than 3,500 Asian elephants in the wild and 3,500 to 4,000 elephants in captivity. The Asian elephant is currently listed as endangered with populations decreasing throughout the world. Illegally smuggling elephants from the wild could have negative impacts on elephant populations, especially considering the high commercial value of young individuals.

In addition to concerns on the conservation of elephants, animal advocates point to the inhumane living conditions of elephants at the camps. A report by World Animal Protection found that nearly 75% of the elephants they studied living in Asian elephant camps lived in poor conditions.

The report notes “When not giving rides or performing, the elephants were typically chained day and night, most of the time to chains less than 3m long. They were also fed poor diets, given limited appropriate veterinary care and were frequently kept on concrete floors in stressful locations near loud music, roads or visitor groups.”

A 2015 study published in PLOS One found similar results. The study examined the welfare of Asian elephants, Pig-tailed macaques and tigers at tourism venues in Thailand. Eighty-six percent of the elephants were kept on short chains when they were not interacting with tourists and 25.6% were kept on concrete ground which can cause health issues in elephants. Further, over one-third of the elephants were kept isolated from each other. For the highly social species, this can cause severe distress and boredom.

Proponents of elephant tourism in Thailand argue that the camps provide an income for the elephant handlers and a home for the elephants who can no longer be used for the logging industry.

The tourism industry may be able to help the both local people and elephants if it is done right. Travelers’ desire to visit the beautiful giants in person will not dissipate soon. Tourism venues can provide these awe-inspiring experiences and protect elephants in the country by adhering to strict welfare standards.

Responsible Travel, a travel website which promotes responsible tourism, recommends avoiding places where elephants are forced to perform or give rides. The website screens elephant sanctuaries to ensure they are humane before featuring them on their website. Their recommendations mirror the results in the World Animal Protection report which found that the elephants with the highest welfare conditions were living at camps that did not allow rides or performances.

Sadly, responsible tourism is not as easy as avoiding notoriously cruel animal attractions such as circuses and animal contests. Travelers need to conduct thorough research before visiting an animal attraction to ensure they are visiting a truly humane attraction.

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https://www.earth.com/news/elephant-sanctuary-attractions-inhumane/

Monday, November 19, 2018

Slain elephant shot with military assault rifle



An elephant that was killed near Huay Sai Yai waterfall at the Buntharik-Yod Mon wildlife sanctuary in Ubon Ratchathani was shot by a high-power gun, say officials. An AK-47 bullet hit the elephant in the mouth and such was its ferocity that it tore right through the animal’s torso to its left rear leg, where it exited.

Another AK-47 bullet was found lodged in its rib. The trajectory of the bullet also indicated the shooter had been at the same ground level.

The results of the initial examination were reported by Protected Area Regional Office 9 director Chaiwat Limlikhit-aksornn following the discovery of the elephant carcass by forensic police, sanctuary officials and veterinarians. They also conducted a swab test at the elephant’s tongue and tusk to look for gunpowder residue to confirm the theory, he said.

Forensic officials have received photos taken from a nearby previously-installed “camera trap” – they showed a man carrying an AK-47 rifle and a GPS device, and wearing clothes that resembled a neighbouring country’s military uniform. The photos were taken one kilometre away from the waterfall and it is suspected that he was involved in the elephant’s death.

The male elephant, aged 25-35 years and weighing around 4 tonnes, was found dead on November 14 by wildlife sanctuary officials. It was immediately suspected that it had been killed by a group of armed people who crossed the border from a neighbouring country to poach elephants and cut down Siamese Rosewood trees in the Thai wildlife sanctuary.

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https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1069444-slain-elephant-shot-with-military-assault-rifle/?tab=comments#comment-13581031

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Elephant recaptured after killing handler in Mahasarakham


An elephant that fled after it kicked its handler to death in Mahasarakham on Friday night has been recaptured after being shot with a tranquiliser dart by a veterinarian.

The elephant, known as Samson, was among five pachyderms hired by the abbot of Wat Pa Wang Nam Yen to participate in a krathin merit making procession scheduled for Saturday.

But shortly after the five elephants arrived from Surin, Samson became tense and kicked its handler, Sao Salakham, 60, and fled.

Mahasarakham governor Kiartisak Chantha assembled a team of 50 troops and policemen to recapture the elephant with help from a veterinarian from the Surin Elephant Village, Pratthan Inthawong.

Pratthana shot the animal with five tranquiliser darts at 1am on Saturday and waited two hours for it to calm down before it could be herded to a truck to be sent back to Surin along with the four other pachyderms.

The temple cancelled the elephant procession following the tragic incident.

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https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1069098-elephant-recaptured-after-killing-handler-in-mahasarakham/?tab=comments#comment-13572686

Friday, November 16, 2018

Task force seeks help from Laos to trace elephant killers


The Second Army Region’s Suranaree Task Force is to seek help from Laos to find the killers of an elephant in a national park in the border province of Ubon Ratchathani.

Deputy national police chief Pol General Srivara Rangsibhramanakul said yesterday the spent bullet found in the body of a male elephant was from an AK47 rifle, a weapon not used in Thailand.

He did not mention the name of the country the task force contacted to help, saying only that it was a neighbouring country. However, Ubon Ratchathani is close to Laos.

The remains of the elephant were found near Huay Sai Yai waterfall in BuntarikYod Mon Wildlife Sanctuary on Friday. Officials believe it was shot in the mouth and the bullet penetrated to the back of the animal's body.

Officials believe the animal did not die at the scene of the shooting.

Basing on photos from camera traps installed in the area, the killers are believed to be a group of armed men in camouflage clothing. The men, using GPS tracking devices, were believed to have entered the area for illegal logging.

Authorities believe the men did not intend to kill the animal as its organs were still intact.

Srivara said that although the elephant was found in the national park, it is near a no man’s land where there has been fighting between illegal loggers.

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http://teakdoor.com/thailand-and-asia-news/188446-task-force-seeks-help-laos-trace.html

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

A wounded elephant captured for treatment


Officials and volunteers at Surat Thani’s Kaeng Krung National Park on Tuesday capture a 2.6-tonne male elephant with an injured right rear leg.

The pachyderm, believed to be between 25 and 30 years old, had been wandering in tambon Pak Mak of Chaiya district.

It was treated with three shots of tranquilliser as well as antibiotics, inflammation relief medicine and vitamins.

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https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1068475-surat-thani-wounded-elephant-captured-for-treatment/?tab=comments#comment-13564881

Monday, November 12, 2018

Wild elephants force change of venue for XTERRA Trail Run in Thailand


The XTERRA Nong Yai Trail Run in Thailand will still take place on November 18th, but the race will now be held at Khao Mai Kaew Reservation Park in the Chonburi province, south of Bangkok. Now named the XTERRA Khao Mai Kaew Trail Run, the event will still feature 50K, 25K, 10K, and 3K courses.

XTERRA added that the reason for changing the venue is one of those ‘only in XTERRA moments’. Wild elephants moved onto the trails at Nong Yai and decided to stay for a while, posing a potential hazard to runners in the area.

‘Because the race is so popular and over one thousand people registered, the event has been moved rather than cancelled.’

The new venue at the Khao Mai Kaew Reservation Park is a well-known running trail close to the resort city of Pattaya.

The details of the race are available online and all registered athletes were contacted on October 24th about the change in venue.

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https://www.endurancebusiness.com/2018/industry-news/wild-elephants-force-change-of-venue-for-xterra-trail-run-in-thailand/

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Canadian tourist’s leg crushed by elephant in Thailand


A 38-year-old Canadian tourist was injured when her left leg was crushed by an elephant’s trunk after she fell off the pachyderm at an elephant camp near Nark Kerd Hill in Chalong. The woman is being treated at Bangkok Hospital Phuket. Wirawit Pakprom, the elephant’s mahout, told police that the female tourist and a male […] Travel...

To read the full article, click on the story title.

Saturday, November 10, 2018

Canadian tourist’s leg crushed by elephant in Thailand


A 38-year-old Canadian tourist was injured when her left leg was crushed by an elephant’s trunk after she fell off the pachyderm at an elephant camp near Nark Kerd Hill in Chalong.

The woman is being treated at Bangkok Hospital Phuket.

Wirawit Pakprom, the elephant’s mahout, told police that the female tourist and a male friend were riding on the back of an 16-year-old male elephant named “Plai Benz”.

An initial report said that the elephant was eating a pineapple at the side of the route, about about 80 metres from the elephant mounting point.

The Canadian woman was taking photos and not holding onto the chair when the elephant shook its body and she fell to the ground.

When she fell off, the elephant panicked and pushed on the tourist’s left leg with its trunk.

Chalong Police have visited the tourist in hospital.

The elephant camp says it will pay for the tourist’s medical fees.

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https://www.eturbonews.com/237702/canadian-tourists-left-leg-crushed-by-elephant-in-thailand

Friday, November 09, 2018

Man Trampled to Death by Wild Elephants in Western Thailand


KANCHANABURI – A Thai man hunting for wild mushrooms in Salak Phra Wildlife Sanctuary in western Thailand was trampled to death by wild elephants on Sunday.

Prasan Thongdonmuen, 42, and two friends went into Salak Phra Wildlife Sanctuary in Sri Sawat district on Sunday, Suriya Kaewdamrong, the Sri Sawat deputy police chief, said.

One of Prasan’s his companions told police that while searching for mushrooms they accidentally disturbed a herd of elephants. All three turned and fled. He and his friend lost track of Prasan and later returned along the track, looking for him. Instead, they found his body.

Pol Col Suriya said Prasan’s body was severely crushed, suffering major trauma. The body was sent to Tha Kradan Hospital for postmortem examination.

Prasan was the second recent victim of wild elephants in that area. Kamolchai Chanthawong, 54, was killed on Oct 15 while collecting wild plants.

According to wildlife sanctuary officials, about 30 wild elephants live in the area.

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https://www.chiangraitimes.com/man-trampled-to-death-by-wild-elephants-in-western-thailand.html







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https://elephantsthailand.blogspot.com/2018/11/man-trampled-to-death-by-wild-elephants.html

OLD ELEPHANTS FORCED TO GIVE RIDES FOR DECADES ARE NOW BEST FRIENDS


Nam Phon was one of the first elephants to retire at the Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand (WFFT) Elephant Refuge in 2004. She lived a peaceful life at the refuge for six years, enjoying her days in the company of her own kind after spending most of her life carrying tourists at various elephant camps.

But in 2010, Nam Phon’s former owner decided to take her back – and force her into hard labor once more.

Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

“It is most likely that she was poached from the wild as an infant, witnessing her mother and other herd members butchered and then sold on into the logging industry, and later into the tourist industry,” WFFT wrote on Facebook. “She has been at elephant camps giving rides to tourists each day for the last five years. The camp in which she came from is notoriously known as an abusive place for elephants.”

Nam Phon’s ‘”resting place” at the elephant camp |Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

At the time of her initial rescue, WFFT didn’t have the finances needed to pay elephant owners to allow their animals to permanently retire at the sanctuary.

Nam Phon’s restraints while at the elephant camp |Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

So, Nam Phon was ripped away from her home and friends, sentenced to more years of hard labor. However, after negotiating with Nam Phon’s owner for years, WFFT was able to bring her back, rescuing her from a nearby trekking camp in west Thailand in March 2016.

Nam Fon on the day of her rescue |Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

Upon her arrival, Nam Phon, who is now 55, was greeted by her old friends, Khan Kluey and Somboon – and ever since her return, she has become close to another female elephant at the refuge, Jele.

Jele |Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

Jele, who is 60, was found chained to a tree and left to die after her use as a trekking elephant came to an end. But she was rescued, rehabilitated and came to show off her true personality as a friendly and confident elephant – and a master escape artist at that, according to WFFT. She’s managed to make it out of her enclosure three times.

Nam Fon and Jele |Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

It only made sense that a senior girl like Jele would have a thing or two to teach Nam Phon, who is more relaxed and loves to amble at her own pace.

Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

The pair is now practically inseparable and they are often seen “holding hands” with their trunks.

Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

Even though Nam Phon’s back legs are slightly lame from all the labor she’s endured, she seems to have little trouble keeping up with her adventurous best friend.

Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand

More importantly, both elephants now get to spend their golden years together, free from the cycle of abuse they once had no choice but to engage in.

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http://www.aboutfamilypets.com/old-elephants-forced-to-give-rides-for-decades-are-now-best-friends/

Man Trampled to Death by Wild Elephants in Western Thailand


KANCHANABURI – A Thai man hunting for wild mushrooms in Salak Phra Wildlife Sanctuary in western Thailand was trampled to death by wild elephants on Sunday.

Prasan Thongdonmuen, 42, and two friends went into Salak Phra Wildlife Sanctuary in Sri Sawat district on Sunday, Suriya Kaewdamrong, the Sri Sawat deputy police chief, said.

One of Prasan’s his companions told police that while searching for mushrooms they accidentally disturbed a herd of elephants. All three turned and fled. He and his friend lost track of Prasan and later returned along the track, looking for him. Instead, they found his body.

Pol Col Suriya said Prasan’s body was severely crushed, suffering major trauma. The body was sent to Tha Kradan Hospital for postmortem examination.

Prasan was the second recent victim of wild elephants in that area. Kamolchai Chanthawong, 54, was killed on Oct 15 while collecting wild plants.

According to wildlife sanctuary officials, about 30 wild elephants live in the area.

Please credit and share this article with others using this link:
https://www.chiangraitimes.com/man-trampled-to-death-by-wild-elephants-in-western-thailand.html

Monday, November 05, 2018

A man and a piano in the Thai jungle are bringing peace to tortured elephants

A British pianist, living in Thailand, has taken his craft to entirely new heights. Somewhere, deep in the jungle, 57-year-old Paul Barton has dragged …

To read the full article, click on the story title.

UK man performs piano for previous elephants in Thailand sanctuary: Video


A British pianist, living in Thailand, has taken his craft to entirely new
heights.

Somewhere, deep in the jungle, 57-year-old Paul Barton has dragged his
piano into a clearing, on the banks of the River Kwai, to play music for old,
injured and disabled elephants.

The self-taught pianist met his larger than life audience during a visit to an
elephant sanctuary with his wife in 2011.

“I wondered if these old elephants might like to listen to some slow
classical music when I arrived, so I asked if I could bring my piano along
and they allowed it,” Mr Barton said.

Roping in a bunch of mates to help him load his upright piano onto the
back of a ute, Mr Barton drove it up the mountain and into the middle of
the Elephants World sanctuary.

Untethered and free to wander and graze as they please, elephants would
surround Mr Barton and his piano during each visit, fascinated by the
calming sounds of Beethoven, Mozart, Bach and Debussy.

Mr Barton uploads videos of his jungle concerts to his YouTube channel,
showing baby elephants who squeak and bark along to the music, and
older elephants that flap their ears and sway as the he plays.

“It’s said elephants memorise your scent and will think of you as a friend
the next time you’re together,” he said.

“When I play music to elephants I always feel calm and happy.”

Mr Barton will calm the elephants, welcoming him to his
piano before sitting down to play for them. Picture: YouTube

According to Mr Barton, it’s a feeling most of the sanctuary’s residents
haven’t felt in a long time.

Many of the elephants ended up there after falling victim to ivory hunters,
while others were left injured, abused or homeless after a lifetime working
for humans on deforestation sites across Thailand.

Mr Barton said the first time he played his piano in the jungle, a blind
elephant called Pla-Ra stopped eating his breakfast and stood completely
still “listening to the music with grass protruding from his mouth”.
Pla-Ra had come to the sanctuary after his previous owner removed and
sold his tusks.

“A bad infection set in and he was often in pain from the holes where his
tusks had been cruelly removed,” Mr Barton said.

“I like to think that the soothing music gave him some comfort in the
darkness.”

Sadly, Pla-Ra didn’t survive the infection.

“I became very close to Pla-Ra and I was devastated when he died,” he
said.

I’m calling it: This story will be snatched up and made into an Oscarwinning
feature film, starring the kind old Morgan Freeman, before you
can say “pachyderm”.

Mr Barton says he has devloped a deep affection for the
animals at Elephants World sanctuary. Picture: YouTube

Mr Barton chooses particular songs he thinks each elephant will like.
It must work because he has been doing it for years and has some
seriously big fans.

“Elephants are emotional animals, like us, and I’m just following my
instincts to play music for them,” he said.

“All I can do is hope that the work we do can make the lives of these
rescued elephants a little bit better.”

Mr Barton said sometimes the elephants even drape their trunks over the
piano to “explore the keys for themselves”.

“I hope that music like this will be part of a process of rehabilitation for
elephants that have had stressful lives,” he said.

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Wednesday, October 24, 2018

‘Re-wilding’ Thailand’s elephants is unworkable


Re: “Finally, co-operation to end cruel abuse of these gentle Thai giants”, Have Your Say, yesterday.

Elephant polo tournaments must be one of the most idiotic ideas ever conjured up by Homo sapiens, and as far as I can make out these events, although no doubt raising funds for charity, were primarily designed to provide an opportunity for Bangkok’s “high society” to parade around in funny hats and get themselves featured in Thailand Tatler magazine. However, Paul Tweddell, presumably a supporter or member of that cult-like movement PETA, gets in on the act to tell us that the pachyderms should be returned to “the wild”. Well, good luck with that. PETA’s founder and current president Ingrid Newkirk, a woman with some very strange ideas, envisages a time when all dogs, instead of being kept as pets, will also live out their natural lives in “the wild”, which, if these folks get their way, is going to become a very crowded place. Indeed, I doubt if there is enough of “the wild” left in Thailand to support all this teeming animal life. At least the elephant camps provide safe havens for these (usually) gentle giants, and it would surely be more practical for PETA to promote high animal-welfare standards in these camps, rather than espousing crazy and unworkable theories.

Robin Grant

Bangkok

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Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Elephant Polo Ends in Thailand After Investigation Finds Cruelty


Bangkok – The Thailand Elephant Polo Association isn’t seeking permission for a 2019 King’s Cup Elephant Polo Tournament and has ceased operations in Thailand, effectively marking the end of elephant polo in the country, after the findings of a PETA Asia exposé horrified sponsors, causing them to withdraw. This development comes after damning video footage released by PETA Asia showed handlers viciously beating elephants at last year’s tournament, prompting a global outcry and a dozen companies—including Ecolab, IBM, Angus Energy, Banfi Vintners, and Vespa—to pull their sponsorships of the cruel competition. The video also showed elephants being subjected to other abusive treatment, including being chained in standing water.

“No one with any decency or compassion wants elephants to be beaten bloody and forced to play polo, give rides, or perform stupid tricks,” says PETA President Ingrid Newkirk. “PETA is pleased that this abusive spectacle is now history, and we’re committed to ensuring that all other animal-exploiting stunts disappear, too.”

The footage from PETA Asia’s investigation, which was shot from the windows of hotels and apartments near the tournament venue, showed handlers in a holding area next to the polo grounds repeatedly beating and jabbing elephants’ heads with bullhooks—weapons resembling a fireplace poker with a sharp metal hook on one end—which they also used to yank the animals by their extremely sensitive ears. Some elephants were beaten until they bled, and one was left chained in water all day.

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to use for entertainment”—points out that elephants used for polo tournaments, rides, or any other type of entertainment endure violent training sessions to force them into submission, during which they’re regularly beaten. Between matches, they’re often shackled to chains so short that the animals can barely take a single step.

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Sunday, October 21, 2018

Elephants ruin Korat corn harvest


Nakhon Ratchasima farmers have been promised assistance after wild elephants from Thap Lan National Park ravaged cornfields as much as two kilometres away.

“They ate my crop just days before I planned to harvest it,” Jamnong Karbbua, 45, lamented on Sunday. “My neighbours have also faced the same problem.” He’d used various tactics to keep away roving elephants but they’d still managed to stomp and chew through four rai of corn. National Park chief Prawit Saengsakul inspected the damage in person and the authorities pledged to prepare “remedial action” for the farmers affected.

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Saturday, October 20, 2018

Elephant auction nets $16,700 for local charities and more


ERWIN — With auctioneer Kimball Sterling presiding over the bidding, Saturday's Erwin Elephant Revival auction of eight baby elephant statues raised $16,700 for local charities and two nonprofit elephant protection groups.

Jamie Rice, president of the RISE Erwin young professionals organization, which brought the benefit public art auction to town for the first time last year, was excited over the the results.

“We did great. They all sold. We raised a lot of money for a lot of charities. And we’re excited we will be able to keep this public art auction going.”

Rice estimated a crowd of about 50 people stood through the rain that fell on the early afternoon auction at The Gathering Place park downtown to bid and say farewell as the popular little elephant herd left town.

“The rain didn’t dampen their spirits. They all came here to support the Elephant Revival and we’re thrilled it’s going to continue. Our third herd of baby elephant statues will debut in May, and we’re already looking for sponsors,” Rice said.

The buyers and sponsors were happy as well.

Jim Davis, owner of the McDonald’s of Erwin, was both, sponsoring an elephant to benefit the Ronald McDonald House and purchasing an elephant that will also go the local Ronald McDonald House, if there’s room for it, he said. “If not, it will go to my house.”

Nancy Murphy of Johnson City was quite happy with her purchase of Chintz, the paisley elephant from which the lion’s share of the proceeds will go the Holston United Methodist Home for Children. Chintz, meanwhile, was destined for Murphy’s living room.

Lori and Jenna Miller of Gray were two more happy buyers, and were likewise taking their new elephant, Stella, home to Gray, where she will go on display alongside the baby elephant statue they purchased in last year’s auction.

Other nonprofit beneficiaries of Saturday’s auction included Relay for Life of Unicoi County, Love Chapel Christian Church in Erwin, The Elephant Sanctuary in Hohenwald, Tennessee, and the Elephant Parade of Thailand charitable foundation for the protection of Asian elephant habitats.

To sponsor an elephant in next year’s auction, or for more details about the Erwin Elephant Revival, contact Jamie Rice at communications@erwintn.org or 423-220-7624.

Email Sue Guinn Legg at slegg@johnsoncitypress.com. Follow her on Twitter @sueleggjcpress. Like her on Facebook at facebook.com/sueleggjcpress.

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SPECIAL REPORT: Wildlife forensics gives a new voice to illegally hunted wildlife


Young wildlife researcher Kanita Ouitvon was shocked when she first saw the number of animal species, many unknown to her, that were up for sale at a local market in the North some years ago, when she had just joined the National Parks Department (DNP).

“Depressing and distressing” were the words that came to Kanita’s mind that day, as she realised that poaching was part of tradition and people’s livelihoods, and that wildlife consumption was part of their everyday lives.

“It’s something that has stuck in my mind since, and I’ve always wanted to help in anyway I can,” Kanita said as she recalled realising on that day long ago that gaps in law enforcement had to be filled in to nail down poachers and save wildlife.

Understanding that the undeniable truth was hidden in DNA, Kanita decided to pursue her Doctorate degree in Molecular Biology at Kasetsart University, where she had earned her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Forestry. She earned the Doctorate before returning to the department, where she pushed to create the country’s first wildlife forensic science unit with the support of her ex-chief at the Wildlife Conservation Office, Chatchawan Pitdamkham.

Wildlife forensics

Thailand was hardly aware of wildlife forensics until a team of forensic police, led by former commissioner of the Office of Police Forensic Science and adviser to Royal Thai Police, Pol General Jarumporn Suramanee, investigated the gruesome killing of two elephants in Kaeng Krachan National Park between 2010 and 2012. There, the team applied the knowledge of forensic science to solve the case and catch the poachers.

Forensic science is applied to both human and wildlife killings following the same principles and work approach, said Jarumporn, who was appointed to a special panel by the Natural Resources and Environment Ministry to help in the high-profile case of a black leopard killing earlier this year.

Establishing a crime scene as the entry point, examining “all related evidence” is the next step in the process of discovering who committed the crime. Jarumporn explained that “forensic evidence” helps tell the tale of what and how the crime happened, or “modus operandi” (method of operation). This will then lead to the motives behind the actions and to the culprits, Jarumporn added.

A crucial part of forensic work is DNA. DNA “cannot be wrong”, especially since brutally killed animals cannot speak for themselves and often come in pieces. Hence, DNA checks are increasingly being relied on to help resolve wildlife crimes.

The forensics

It was on a month-long training programme by the UK-based Trace Wildlife Forensics Network that Kanita realised how critical DNA examination of wildlife forensics would be to resolving wildlife crimes.

Forensics, she explained, comes from the Latin word, forensis, which means “discuss” or “debate”. As applied to court procedures, the process involves finding facts and evidence to support their arguments in court.

Forensic science used to help resolve court cases, or “forensics”, refers to applying any known science to find or confirm facts in evidence, or what Kanita calls, “the answers”, to the point that the court can be convinced to accept them and proceed with legal action.

In other countries, wildlife forensics has been further developed thanks to the success some three decades ago in developing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) – a laboratory technique to multiply DNA strands to identify or find certain DNA, according to Kanita.

The introduction of PCR and DNA Sequencing technologies have led to a leapfrogging in knowledge and has been extensively applied to other fields, including wildlife forensics.

“DNA is something tremendously specific and therefore cannot be wrong. Unlike normal research, they are not just samples, but ‘evidence’ and with their straightforwardness they are accepted by the court,” Kanita explained.

While some university labs take samples for testing upon request, a small two-container lab initiated by Kanita has become focused on the work, and over time has helped tackle wildlife crimes in line with the department’s law-enforcement mission.

Since its opening around eight years ago, the DNP’s Wildlife Forensic Science Unit (DNP-WIFOS) laboratory, which Kanita heads, has so far taken nearly 4,800 pieces of evidence from 285 cases.

Starting with small cases related to the hunting of wild animals such as barking deer, the lab has taken on evidence of increasingly serious cases ranging from trafficking of African ivory to the recent high profile case of black-leopard poaching in Thung Yai Naresuan Wildlife Sanctuary. That case involves construction tycoon Premchai Karnasuta, the Italian-Thai Development Plc president. The latest case involves the killing of a bearcat in Sai Yok National Park, in which the deputy district chief of Makham Tia district in Kanchanaburi province is a suspect.

Into the DNA

Unlike human forensics, which focuses on the single species of Homo Sapiens, wildlife forensics work on a number of species that can be found worldwide, and so Kanita sees this as a “different challenge” for her lab.

In the tiny space where chemical and biological elements as well as other laboratory tools are deployed to help reveal the truth hidden in the DNA, the nine members of DNP-WIFOS lab are busy decoding DNA hidden in items that range from blood stains to the butchered flesh of wild animals.

Kanita said her team of scientists try to answer two key questions to resolve wildlife crimes. First, they need to discover from blood and flesh samples what kind of the animals they were. Second, whether the animals are protected species. It’s species identification using the DNA Sequencing method.

Answering such seemingly simple questions can help confirm whether the animals had fallen victim in the forest, Kanita said.

In the more complicated cases such as the black leopard or the binturong (bearcat) cases, Kanita’s team needs to go on to learn whether or not the scattered pieces of flesh, or the blood stains, found at the scenes belonged to the same animals. This is the process of individual identification using DNA fragment analysis, which can also be applied to the cases, under which relationships of the animals are needed to be established, or the process of parentage testing.

Such established facts help nail down the culprits, regardless of what they claim the animals were, the DNA will accurately determine the truth. The dead animal cannot be something other than what the DNA says, Kanita explained, adding that the findings lack bias and are straightforward due to the nature of the work and the DNA.

The chain of custody

Since evidence collected from crime scenes is critical to court cases, the process of collecting evidence at the scene is also a critical part of the success of their work.

A “chain of custody”, the protection of evidence from the origins to the destination at her lab, has been introduced with new procedures being developed and applied to cases.

In the lab, the chain of custody has also been applied.

All these precautions ensure that the evidence collected from the crimes scenes is truely original, and that the original evidence is not lost or swapped along the way.

Records of evidence and actions, as well as the people involved, are produced. Combined with the results of the DNA testing, a case file will be produced to accompany the police reports to be submitted to the court.

Kanita’s work, however, is not finished yet.

In every court case her team works on, Kanita must go to court to testify. She cannot say how many times she has testified now, because the lab is constantly busy testing DNA from pieces of evidence sent them almost daily – around 800 a year on average.

Kanita just hopes the lab space and staff are expanded, as they need more help. Wildlife crimes are still being committed despite the state suppression.

Park and wildlife rangers, she added, should get systematic training on the chain of custody so that they will be equipped with the knowledge and are able to guard the evidence needed in the cases from the start, including evidence collection.

WIFOS lab has progressed during the past eight years with accumulation of experiences, and Thailand has recently been recognised along with Malyasia, Indonesia, and Vietnam at the Asia Wildlife Forensics Network Meeting as the country in the region where wildlife DNA forensic capacity exists or is developing.

The critical work that has earned it praise from other countries are the recent completion of the domestic elephant DNA database and the current efforts to create the national DNA database for captive tigers as Thailand is the only one country inthe region that has managed to develop such the databases.

WIFOS lab head, meanwhile, just hopes the very existence of the lab as a critical tool to help dig up the deepest truths, will help deter the ill intention of culprits.

“I just hope they will realise that it’s not easy to shoot a wild animal any more. At least we have the tool to trace them; with that at least they should think twice before committing a crime,” Kanita concluded.

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https://news.thaivisa.com/article/27322/special-report-wildlife-forensics-gives-a-new-voice-to-illegally-hunted-wildlife

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Biology major worked with elephants in Thailand


Deanna Yates, a junior biology major, spent two weeks in Thailand during the summer helping animals and learning hands-on what it’s like to be a veterinarian. Traveling with study-abroad organization Loop Abroad, Yates was selected as part of a small team that volunteered giving care at a dog shelter and spent a week working directly with rescued elephants at an elephant sanctuary.

The Veterinary Service program brings students to Thailand for two weeks to volunteer alongside veterinarians from the U.S. and Thailand. Yates and her team volunteered at the Elephant Nature Park in northern Thailand to work hands-on with the giant animals and learn about animal rescue and conservation on a larger scale. The Elephant Nature Park is home to over 60 elephants who have been rescued from trekking, logging, or forced breeding programs. Many of them had been abused and suffer from chronic injuries or blindness.

Yates said, “My favorite part of Elephant Nature Park was acknowledging and understanding their hands-off approach with the elephants. Observing the elephants from a distance is a better experience than forcing the elephants to do things that they don’t want to do, such as the cruel treatment of elephant rides and pictures!”

For the other week, she volunteered at the Animal Rescue Kingdom dog shelter and helped to run Loop Abroad’s Dog Rescue Clinic in Chiang Mai, Thailand. By providing check-ups and cleanings, diagnosing and treating ear and eye problems, taking and testing blood, administering vaccines, cleaning and treating wounds, and helping with sterilization surgeries, the students were able to help support the health and well-being of these dogs.

By following a study abroad model instead of a voluntourism model, Loop focuses on educating its students so that they can contribute and serve in meaningful ways. Loop Abroad has animal science, marine biology, and veterinary programs for students and young adults in several countries and offers financial aid and fundraising help. Programs range from two weeks in summer to a full semester abroad, and college credit is available.

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http://www.charlestonsouthern.edu/news/biology-major-worked-with-elephants-in-thailand.php

Monday, October 15, 2018

ELEPHANTS LIKELY KILLED MAN IN KANCHANABURI SANCTUARY


A wild elephant apparently killed a man foraging for food in Kanchanaburi’s Sri Sawat district on Sunday night.

Kamonchai Chanthawong, 54, was found with a caved-in chest and broken legs and right arm among torn trees and elephant footprints at 8pm, a kilometre from Highway 3199 in Tambon Nong Ped.

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Wild Elephants Stomp Villager to Death in West Central Thailand


The man's skull was fractured and his legs broken. Elephants’ footprints were found nearby, and many of the trees in the area were damaged.

KANCHANABURI – Forest Rangers have reported that a herd of wild elephants have stomped a man to death while he was collecting forest products at Salak Phra Wildlife Sanctuary in Sri Sawat district of Nanchanaburi, Province.

When he did not return home that night, his family sought help from police to search for him in the forest, fearing he might be in trouble.

A team of police, soldiers, wildlife sanctuary officials and local residents began the search and found Mr Kamochai lying dead in the forest, about 1km away from Kanchanaburi-Sri Sawat Road, Pol Col Wanchai Onla-or, chief of Sri Sawat police station said on Monday.

Kamolchai’s skull was fractured and his legs broken. Elephants’ footprints were found nearby, and many of the trees in the area were damaged.

Authorities believed the man was stomped to death by a herd of wild elephants. According to wildlife sanctuary officials, the area is the habitat of about 30 wild jumbos.

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Friday, October 12, 2018

Thai domesticated elephants stolen from wild in Myanmar


Re: “Unlike PETA, Heinecke’s Minor International has made huge strides in elephant welfare”

, Have Your Say, yesterday.

It’s strange that Carine SteigerMaldaque would simultaneously praise Bill Heinecke and

attack Jason Baker of PETA. By agreeing that there should be no more elephant polo in

Thailand wasn’t Heinecke agreeing with Baker? He probably saw Baker’s video of one of

the elephants in the tournament being beaten.

It is also not true that all elephants in Thailand are domestic. Many are stolen from the

wild in Myanmar and then savagely tortured for days to break their spirit so they won’t

refuse to give rides. If Carine is not aware of that, then she shouldn’t be writing about a

subject she knows nothing about.

Eric Bahrt Chiang Mai

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Thursday, October 11, 2018

"Foreigners just don't understand elephants" says unrepentant and under fire zoo director


Jeez man people should get a life, nothing wrong with this and of course it brings in money to feed the elephants which Im sure is a massive amount.

Next we be saying the horse and pony wild west shows are cruel.

Who cares about the Daily mail anyway isn't the website banned in Thailand?

You get a life..what is accepted as "normal" behavior is certainly subjective. If you think that this is "normal", then go elsewhere.

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Tuesday, October 02, 2018

Park chief warns of randy elephants


The head of the Kaeng Krachan national park in Phetchaburi has warned the public to take care after a video showed an elephant in musth.

An elephant in musth is believed to have an up to six times rise in reproductive hormones.

They can become dangerous to their own kind as well as humans during this period that can last for many weeks.

The video showed a violent altercation between two elephants - one a bull elephant the other of unspecified gender - on the "Nong Plub - Huay Sat Yai" Road in the national park.

Mana Phermphoon warned the public to be on the lookout as his staff try to help the situation by isolating the animal.

Sometimes elephants in musth are denied food and water in an effort to calm them down. Many zookeepers have been killed and animals in the wild also present serious problems.

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https://news.thaivisa.com/article/26579/park-chief-warns-of-randy-elephants

Thailand lauded for war on ivory smugglers


Thailand has been praised for its achievement in tackling the illegal ivory trade as mandated by Cites, according to the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP).

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Cites) is an international agreement between governments that aims to monitor the trade of endangered species, and Thailand...

"This is good news. Thailand does not have to follow the National Ivory Action Plan (NIAP) action plan anymore, but it does not mean that we will lower our guard," said Somkiat Soontornpitakkool, director...

According to Cites, Thailand -- along with China, Kenya, the Philippines and Uganda -- will no longer have to follow their national action plans because of their outstanding performances in dealing with...

NIAP is a measure that the Thai government pledged to execute in order to deal with the illegal trade of ivory. In 2016, Thailand and several other states were placed by Cites under the "Primary Concern"...

If Thailand failed to solve the problem, it faced the possibility of being delisted as a member of Cites, which may then have resulted in economic losses from diminished flora and fauna trade.

Since then, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha has declared a war against poaching, which resulted in implementation of NIAP to crack down on the trade of illegal ivory.

The African elephant is listed as a protected species under the Wildlife Preservation and Protection Act BE 2535, which provides a legal basis for prosecution.

Under NIAP, the government also requires owners of ivory items to register them with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. Over 500,000 kilogrammes of ivory have been registered.

The National Council for Peace and Order has also ordered authorities to collect the DNA of all domesticated elephants to help ensure that none are killed for commercial purposes.

However, an informed official source told Bangkok Post that Cites is now concerned about tigers and other big cats being displayed in private zoos across Thailand, as there have been claims that tigers...

Last week, the DNP's Forest Hawk task force examined privately-owned zoos in Chon Buri, Phetchaburi and Ubon Ratchathani province and found no irregularities.

Based on DNP's figures, there are 1,464 tigers living in private zoos, while 182 tigers live in state-owned zoos.

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https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1550314/thailand-lauded-for-war-on-ivory-smugglers