Saturday, October 14, 2017

Thai octogenarian faces prosecution for 'questioning 400-year-old royal elephant battle'

An octogenarian historian faces prosecution under Thailand’s strict lese majeste laws for allegedly criticising a royal elephant battle said to have taken place four centuries ago.

Sulak Sivarska, 84, a high profile social critic in his native Thailand, has been summoned before military prosecutors on Monday for reportedly questioning historical accounts of King Naresuan, who reigned from 1590-1605.

Thailand is subject to draconian laws that forbid defaming, insulting or threatening the royal family, with a maximum sentence of 15 years in jail.

Mr Sulak told the Bangkok Post that his case was “not normal” after he was informed by police last week to report to them on Monday. “If the country was normal and there existed rule of law..then there won’t be problems,” he said.

His lawyer, Puangtip Boonsanong, said he did not understand how comments on a historical monarch could violate a law which explicitly covered the reigning monarch, queen, heir apparent and regent.

Mr Sulak’s case stems from comments he made at Bangkok’s Thammasat University in 2014, during a time when the character of King Naresuan was being promoted in nationalist epic period films that were promoted by the newly installed military junta who had just staged a coup.

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Wednesday, October 04, 2017

Villagers' normal life disturbed by elephants in northeastern Thailand

A herd of wild elephants has been keeping disturbing a village in northeastern Thailand for a week, bringing sleepless nights for villagers, local media reported Sunday.

Fields and crops of a village in Nakhorn Rachasima province have been destroyed by five elephants. Locals said the herd spends the day time in dense forests and ventures out to their fields at night, forcing the villagers to take turn to keep watch the move of the animals nightly.

Soldiers have been dispatched to the area to help the villagers keep the rampaging herd from intruding into the hamlet.

Officials are busy trying to keep the herd from entering the villages. No injured has been reported so far.

Elephant attacks are common in Thailand, a country with rich forests where the population of elephants is more than 2,700.

In May, a woman was kicked and killed by wild elephants while she was tapping rubber trees in a plantation in Chachoengsao, a province east to Bangkok in south-central Thailand.

Wild elephants destroying crops and ferociously chasing villagers are reported every year.

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Friday, September 22, 2017

Thieving elephant takes bale of hay from back of truck

An elephant walked into a Thailand road to stop a truck traveling through a national park before stealing a bale of hay from the back of the vehicle.

Witnesses said the truck was traveling through Khao Yai National Park in Nakhon Ratchasima province when an elephant wandered out of the trees and walked into the road to stop the vehicle.

One witness, Savet Rassame, 47, recorded video of the elephant walking around to the side of the truck and stealing a bale of hay from the vehicle's trailer.

''The elephant looked like he was having fun eating a new bale of hay," Rassame said. ''It was a big, big elephant so I think he was hungry. I did not want to go to close to it.''

Park Chief Kanchit Srinappawan said that while the park is known for its many free-roaming elephants, it's rare for the animals to approach vehicles on the road.

''I don't know how the elephant knew the truck would be there carrying hay. He may have sensed it or saw them approaching in the distance," Srinappawan said. ''The elephant came out from the trees and made the driver stop then grabbed the hay.''

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“Say No to Ivory” campaign launched to protect elephants

The campaign, part of the global wildlife programme “When the buying stops, the killing can too”, was launched by the Centre of Hand-on Actions and Networking for Growth and Environment (CHANGE) and WildAid organisation.

CHANGE Director Hoang Thi Minh Hong said her centre is carrying out communication activities to improve public awareness of elephant protection by not buying or using ivory products.
The “Say No to Ivory” campaign is set to last for three years, she noted.

John Baker, Managing Director of WildAid, said the poaching and trading of elephant ivory has been banned in many countries, but the elephant killing in Africa and ivory trading in Asia still occurs. WildAid has worked with China and Thailand to prevent illegal ivory trading. In Vietnam, it is focusing on measures to change people’s wrong belief in the uses of wildlife products, including ivory, through communication publications.

Do Quang Tung, an official from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, said the number of elephants in Vietnam has fallen from more than 1,000 to about 100 which mainly live along the border with Laos and Cambodia. Vietnam has become an illegal point of transit for ivory over the last decade, he noted.

Elephants are being strictly protected at national parks and ivory trading is completely prohibited in the country, Tung said, admitting that a large volume of ivory has still been illegally transported into Vietnam.

Le Nguyen Linh, a customs official at the Saigon Port, said up to 6 tonnes of elephant ivory was seized at this port of entry in the last three months of 2016. Ivory is often hidden in wood blocks or aquatic products inside big containers transported through sea ports.

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SKAL Krabi announces fundraiser to aid establishment of elephant sanctuary

SKAL Krabi announces fundraiser to aid establishment of elephant sanctuary
SKAL Krabi today announced that it has chosen to fully support the Krabi Elephant Sanctuary project founded by Mr Henrik Enevoldsen, who is a passionate local focused on creating a safe haven for Thailand’s mistreated elephants, and hopes to get support to rescue the burdened creatures.

SKAL is an international organisation for tourism professionals with branches across the globe.

To open the sanctuary, Mr Enevoldsen needs B35 million, and says he hopes to have the first 20mn before November, so he can buy the piece of land he has had put on hold and will hopefully become the foundation for a safe haven for abused elephants.

The next 15 million will go to building facilities for the elephants, which he says he hopes to start building around February 2018.

Mr Enevoldsen has received the backing of prominent elephant care activist Sangduen “Lek” Chailert, founder of the Elephant Nature Park, a sanctuary and rescue centre for elephants in Mae Taeng District, Chiang Mai.

In a video in both English and Thai, released by Skal Krabi Ms Chailert urges people to support Mr Enevoldsen in his endeavour to found a sanctuary in Krabi similar to hers.

SKAL Krabi has decided to make this project our charity of choice and we are now organizing our first charity event in full support of Henrik and this amazing project.

To make the event a success and to raise as much money as we can for Henrik, we are asking for support from the community and local businesses by providing prizes and items for the inaugural SKAL Krabi Elephant Sanctuary Auction Fundraiser.

The event will be held at the new Mountain View Complex in Ao Nang, Krabi on Wednesday, November 29, 2017.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Hungry elephant demolished car roof in Thailand

The network got funny footage, which shows how a hungry elephant in the Thai city of Prachuapkhirikhan plundered a pickup truck in search of food. The operator, who captured the incident, preferred to get out of the way of an aggressive animal as soon as possible.

In the frames below, it is captured how the elephant takes down the top of the pickup truck in search of food.

Whether the people who were in the car managed to leave the salon promptly and avoid injuries is not known.

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Sunday, September 10, 2017

Elephant attacks Rayong monk collecting alms

A monk making his alms rounds in Rayong’s Khao Chamao district was attacked by a wild elephant early Friday.

Police said Phra Phanuwat Thanussaro, 24, of Wat Madua Tham suffered broken ribs when the elephant struck him with its trunk. He was taken to Khao Chamao Hospital. The attack occurred on a road near the village of Moo 2 in Tambon Khao Noi.

The monk said the elephant came out of woods and attacked him so suddenly that he had no time to flee, and then just as suddenly returned to the forest.

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Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Tour Operator Finds Solution To Elephant Tourism

AS ELEPHANT TOURISM HITS THE HEADLINES, AND COMPANIES LIKE INTREPID MAKE DEFIANT STANDS AGAINST THE PRACTICE, OYSTER WORLDWIDE IS SPEAKING OUT ABOUT MISTREATMENT OF ELEPHANTS WITHIN THE TOURISM INDUSTRY AND HOW TO GET INVOLVED IN ETHICAL ELEPHANT PROJECTS.

World Animal Protection (WAP) researchers last week announced findings that more than three quarters of the 3000 elephants they assessed were living in ‘severely cruel conditions.’

The researchers claim that an increased market for elephant tourism, including activities such as elephant rides, is fuelling elephant cruelty.

Oyster Worldwide agree with the WAP findings that elephants are being mistreated across the globe for entertainment, and want to raise awareness of ways in which travellers can interact with elephants in safe and ethical settings.

“Oyster Worldwide is pleased that WAP has managed to bring cruelty to animals to the mainstream news. It is incredibly important that travellers and tourists are aware of some of the cruelty that goes on behind the scenes,” Destination Manager Anne Smellie said.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Friday, August 25, 2017

Elephant kills mahout in South

A rampaging elephant killed his mahout and fled into a nearby forest in Nop Phi Tham district before being subdued on Saturday morning.

Veterinarian Pornpirom Fungtakul rushed to tambon Nop Phi Tham after being alerted by local residents that the male elephant “Sidor Mongkhol’’ was hiding in the forest near a fruit plantation.

Local residents were gripped with fear as the pachyderm appeared wild and out of control. The elephant attacked his mahout Thanee Sae Siew, 40, on Friday evening before fleeing into the forest. Thanee was taken to a local hospital and later pronounced dead.

Residents waited until morning before seeking help. The elephant was subdued after the veterinarian shot it with three tranquilliser darts on Saturday morning. He and other local residents then used a rope as a lasso to take the animal to a creek to drink water.

Mr Pornpirom said he had checked the elephant's records and found that Thanee had bought the animal from Chawang district to work in Nop Phi Tham.

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Saturday, August 19, 2017

Henrik wants to create safe haven for elephants in Krabi

In Thailand, elephants suffer from the tourism industry more than any place else in the world. Henrik Enevoldsen from Denmark is trying to create a safe haven for Thailand’s mistreated elephants, and hopes to get support from fellow Scandinavians to rescue the burdened creatures.

Henrik Enevoldsen was only around three or fours years old when he first encountered the large animal that would one day become a significant part of his life. Cirkus Benneweis, one of Denmark’s premier circuses, camped right across from Henrik’s parents’ house in Esbjerg, southern Denmark, and that is when Henrik for the first time saw a real elephant.

“I became very fascinated by this large elephant that looked very different from the other animals we would usually see in Denmark. I would walk back and forth between my parents’ house and the circus to see the elephants by the circus,” said Henrik.

The fascination has followed the now 50-year-old Henrik Enevoldsen ever since that very first encounter, and he is now planning to open up a sanctuary for elephants, abused by the logging and tourism industries, in Krabi, southern Thailand.

Supported elephants right from the start

Henrik came to Thailand the for the first time in 1988 while travelling around Asia. Two years later, in 1990, he decided upon settling down in Krabi where he started Café Europa, a place that have brought many people together over Scandinavian food.

While running Café Europa, Henrik has supported many elephant projects in Thailand, which buys elephants out of mistreatment in the logging and tourism industry and places them in sanctuaries where the elephants are given a better life, away from the abuse which they have often suffered under for many years.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Woman killed in suspected attack by wild elephant

A woman was found dead near a national park in Chanthaburi province’s Soi Dao district on Wednesday in what is believed to have been an attack by a wild elephant.

The body of Thongkhoon Khamphoonput, 58, was found beside a sugar cane plantation and a fruit orchard near Khao Soi Dao National Park in Ban Klong Phok village in Tambon Tabchang of Soi Dao district. The woman was badly injured with two broken legs and bruises all over the body.

Elephant footprints were spotted around her body and there were traces of elephants eating sugar cane and pineapples at the scene.

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Hungry elephants raid farms in Korat

NAKHON RATCHASIMA - A large herd of hungry elephants have raided crops in Soeng Sang district, pillaging almost 30 rai of their favourite farm produce, sugarcane and corn.

Local officials on Thursday surveyed the damage to crops in tambon Ban Rart. Based on the extent of the  damage, they estimated the herd to be at least 20 strong.

Elephant dung amid the raided crop at a farm in Soeng Sang district, Nakhon Ratchasima.

Farmers said they took turns guarding their crops, but had failed in their efforts to drive away the elephants. There were just too many, and nobody dared to anger them.

Their farms are near Thap Lan National Park, a vast area of forest. They did not know which direction the elephants would come from and this made it even harder to guard their crops.

Pimpaporn Rujinrachet, assistant chief of Ban Rart tambon administration organisation, said the elephants had come out of the forest in search of food earlier than usual this year.

Normally, they emerged only during the dry season, when food was often scarce in the park's forest.

The large herd may have depleted their natural supply of food early and turned to raiding local farmland, where their favourite crops, especially sugarcane and corn, were growing.

The TAO would send staff to make joint patrols with the local people, and hopefully keep away the raiding elephants. Help would be provided for farmers whose crops were ruined, Ms Pimpaporn said.

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Friday, August 04, 2017

Death of an elephant causes anxiety among villagers at Khao Kluaymai village

Residents living in a village next to Khao Ang Rue Nai wildlife sanctuary are worried that they will be blamed for the recent death of a bull elephant, suspected of being electrocuted, and they are demanding concerned authorities to quickly find out the actual cause of the jumbo’s demise.

The bull elephant, aged about 20 and weighed about 3 tonnes, was found dead in a sugarcane plantation close to the wildlife sanctuary in Khao Kluaymai village, Tambon Klong Tapao, Tha Takiab district of Chachoengsao on July 18. Its trunk got entangled with a barbed wire of a fence which was connected to a 12-volt car battery.

The barbed wire fence was built around the sugarcane plantation and it was connected to a car battery as a deterrent against trespassing by elephants in search of food.

A team of Thai PBS reporter and cameramen visited Khao Kluaymai village on July 21 to talk to the villagers about how they felt about the elephant’s death and how the animal died.

Mr Chamnien Boonruang, the village’s assistant headman, said that no one in the village had wanted an elephant to die in their village and never before that an elephant was killed by electricity generated from a car battery.

He said that several villagers who have pineapple or sugarcane plantations usually connected their barbed wire with car batteries just to scare away elephants search for food because they knew that it was impossible to prevent the animals from foraging for food in their plantations.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Boy killed by elephants in a fruit orchard in Narathiwat

An eight-year old boy was crushed to death by wild elephants apparently provoked by explosions of gunfires from villagers in their attempt to scare away the jumbos.

The incident took place in a fruit orchard close to a forest in Ban Aye Samor, Tambon Kok Sator, Rueso district of Narathiwat on Tuesday (July 18).

Local officials said that two adult elephants emerged from the jungle and broke into the fruit orchard in search of food. The two animals damaged several fruit trees, prompting villagers to rush to the scene with some of them firing their shot guns into the air, hoping to scare them away.

Instead of being scared away, the two elephants charged toward the villagers, forcing them to scatter in different directors.

Officials said that, accidentally at the time, a villager, Mr Masoreh Deemung was passing through the orchard, riding on a motorcycle with his wife and eight-year old son sitting on the pillion.

The elephants crashed into the motorbike and crushed the boy to death.

Policemen, troops and volunteers were later deployed to the village to monitor the two elephants to prevent them from hurting other villagers.

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Beehive fence stops attacks by hungry elephants

A farmer in Khaeng Hang Maew district of Chanthaburi province has finally found a humane way to keep the hungry jumbos away without harming them – a beehive fence.

CHANTHABURI, Kyodo News – After years of crop and house damage caused by wild elephants in Khaeng Hang Maew district of Chanthaburi province, a local farmer finally found a humane way to keep the hungry jumbos away without harming them – a beehive fence.

The idea of using beehive boxes to protect her crops and house still delights Dararat Sirimaha, a rubber tapper, who earlier achieved little success in preventing the elephants from rampaging through her farmlands.

She had to abandon large parts of her tapioca farm after it was destroyed by the elephants, eventually converting it into a rubber plantation early last year.

She also cut down her banana trees, which elephants feast on, but still remained hopeless.

Confrontation between the local residents and the elephants goes back a decade, but her patience ran out when the elephants attacked her house and injured her father one night.

"It was very scary when 10 elephants surrounded our house and roared," the 37-year-old farmer recalled.

Despite the community's efforts to scare the elephants away by setting off firecrackers, digging a canal and even building a concrete wall, nothing was able to stop the pachyderms from wiping out their crops.

On hearing about the great success of using bees to deter elephants in Africa from the village headman, Ms Dararat had no other alternative but to try the new measure.

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Thai elephant tramples man, runs off with tourists

Police say an elephant trampled its handler to death while two Russian tourists were riding it during a nature trek in southern Thailand.

Police Lt. Col. Narong Laksanawimol said Monday the animal attacked the trainer and ran off with the travelers — a mother and her 9-year-old daughter — near a waterfall in Phang Nga province.

Rescue teams had to track the elephant about 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) and tranquilize it to rescue the tourists clinging to its back. Narong said the 60-year-old trainer had been crushed and drowned in a creek.

He said the male elephant had never attacked anyone since it was brought to work for a tourist company two years ago, adding that the animal was in musth, a state of aggressive sexual excitement.

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Olympic champ Tara has fun with elephants on her Thailand honeymoon

Olympic medallist figure-skater Tara Lipinski, who got married to TV producer Todd Kapostasy last week, is having a ball in Thailand on her honeymoon. She seems to have especially enjoyed her trip to the elephant sanctuary. She posted a series of pictures on Instagram from the Maldives to Thailand.

Recently, she posted this picture and captioned it: “Goodnight from Thailand! What an amazing day at the elephant sanctuary.

A place that really cares about the health and endurance of elephants. Oh and happy 4th of July! One of my favourite holidays.

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Wednesday, August 02, 2017

Tour operator finds solution to elephant tourism

World Animal Protection (WAP) researchers last week announced findings that more than three quarters of the 3000 elephants they assessed were living in ‘severely cruel conditions.’

The researchers claim that an increased market for elephant tourism, including activities such as elephant rides, is fuelling elephant cruelty.

Oyster Worldwide agree with the WAP findings that elephants are being mistreated across the globe for entertainment, and want to raise awareness of ways in which travellers can interact with elephants in safe and ethical settings.

“Oyster Worldwide is pleased that WAP has managed to bring cruelty to animals to the mainstream news. It is incredibly important that travellers and tourists are aware of some of the cruelty that goes on behind the scenes,” Destination Manager Anne Smellie said.

The responsible projects provided by Oyster Worldwide include Thailand, Laos, South Africa and several other destinations, where travellers can work with elephants in a protected environment. These projects include either working with elephants who have been rescued from the cruel tourist trade or protecting elephants in the wild.

With a strict vetting criteria for each of the projects they work with, Oyster Worldwide work closely with their partners to ensure they maintain high standards.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Police Say They Made Progress in Ivory Trade Crackdown

Efforts by the government to curb sales of ivory have been successful following criticism of widespread trafficking in the country, police and conservationists said.

Police announced Friday that since January, officials have seized two elephant tusks and 422 tusk fragments in a single case, while in all of last year they seized 99 tusks and 22 fragments. Deputy Police Commissioner Gen. Chalermkiat Sriworakhan said the drop in the number of cases showed that strict enforcement had deterred traffickers.

“We have made serious efforts to block elephant ivory from being smuggled into the country and sent on to another country,” Chalermkiat said, referring to past smuggling schemes. Now, “if they do get in the country, we do not let them leave.”

Thailand had been considered to have the largest unregulated ivory market in the world before it introduced the Elephant Ivory Act in 2014 and 2015 to regulate the domestic ivory market and criminalize the sale of African elephant ivory.

“We have been able to effectively arrest more and more suspects with tangible results,” said Chalermkiat.

The wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC praised Thailand for a large drop in sales of ivory items. Its survey of Bangkok markets found a decline in the amount of ivory openly for sale from a high of 7,421 items in 2014 to 283 products in June 2016.

Measured over a slightly longer period of time, the drop was even more dramatic. In December 2013, the number of ivory items on sale was 14,512, according to earlier surveys by TRAFFIC.

“Thailand’s legal reforms have paved the way for greater control of the domestic ivory market and it’s certainly something other countries in the region should emulate, especially Laos, Vietnam, and Myanmar,” Kanitha Krishnasamy, acting regional director for TRAFFIC in Southeast Asia, said in an email Friday.

“Further to these efforts, it’s important also to test products in the market to ensure that no African elephant ivory is in the marketplace.”

Poachers have killed tens of thousands of African elephants for their tusks to meet demand for ivory in Asia, putting the species at great risk. Thailand became a major transit hub and destination for smuggled tusks, which are often carved into tourist trinkets and ornaments. The biggest demand comes from China.

Krishnasamy said illegal online trade is another part of the problem affecting the country.

“Monitoring and enforcement of trade taking place online is extremely crucial to make sure that ivory items not on sale in the physical market haven’t moved online,” she said.

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Group finds Asia's performing elephants are treated harshly

An animal protection group wants tourists to know — that elephant you are thinking about riding during your vacation in Thailand is probably a miserable victim of abuse.

London-based World Animal Protection looked at almost 3,000 elephants working at entertainment venues in six Asian nations and found three out of four of the animals are living in poor and unacceptable conditions. It cited being chained day and night when not working, receiving inadequate diets and unsatisfactory veterinary care, as well as undergoing harsh initial training, "that breaks their spirits and makes them submissive enough to give rides and perform."

The group wants tourists to be aware and counsels tour agencies to shun abusive venues, among other measures. It says it has already convinced more than 160 travel companies to stop sales and promotion of venues offering elephant rides and shows.

 The report the group released Thursday is part of a broader campaign by World Animal Protection, which has also sought to expose the living conditions of other animals used to entertain, including tigers, macaques and bears.

 "If you can ride, hug or interact with wild animals, chances are there's cruelty involved," said Dr. Jan Schmidt-Burbach, WAP's global wildlife and veterinary adviser and author of the elephant report.

 Wildlife tourist attractions, including wildlife entertainment, have become increasing popular and hence profitable, meaning the industry is likely to expand, the report warned.

 "The cruel trend of elephants used for rides and shows is growing," said Schmidt-Burbach. "We want tourists to know that many of these elephants are taken from their mothers as babies, forced to endure harsh training and suffer poor living conditions throughout their life."

 The group identified venues by looking at travel guidebooks and similar resources and by visiting tourist areas most likely to offer elephant attractions. It then sent researchers to each venue at least once to document the animals' situations. It found only 194 elephants at 13 venues to be living in acceptable conditions, the major criteria being that the animals do not perform and are not ridden by people.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Monday, July 24, 2017

Elephant smuggling dispute reaches DSI

Wildlife authorities have asked the Department of Special Investigation (DSI) to probe the Ayutthaya Elephant Palace for allegedly smuggling elephants to Germany and keeping wild elephants.

At the DSI head office on Wednesday, Chaiwat Limlikhit-aksorn, an official of the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation, said the Ayutthaya Elephant Palace had been given approval to loan five female elephants to the Cologne Zoo for shows in 2006, but had not brought the
animals back since.

The operator also blocked the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment from confiscating the six-million-baht guarantee it had placed for the temporary export of the elephants.

According to Mr Chaiwat, the female jumbos have given birth to three baby elephants, but the department was never informed. The issue amounts to a violation of the approval framework for the export of elephants and the smuggling of protected animals, Mr Chaiwat said. He believed elephant sperm from Thailand was delivered to Germany for artificial insemination. He also accused the operator of providing false information about the exported elephants.

Besides the export violations, Mr Chaiwat alleged the Ayutthaya Elephant Palace was keeping two elephants that did not match their pet elephant ID documents. He said wildlife protection officials had found the two elephants in Hua Hin district, Prachuap Khiri Khan, and suspected them of being captured wild elephants. They were later brought to the Ayutthaya Elephant Palace.

After officials arrived to check the elephants in Ayutthaya, the operator's owner, Laithongrien Meepan, threatened to bring elephants to a protest at Government House and seek the transfer of the conservation department's chief.

Mr Chaiwat said he asked the DSI to step in because his staff were unable to cope with the operator's "influence". Worranan Srilum, DSI's director for special case management, said DSI officials would quickly consider if the case was under the jurisdiction of the
DSI.

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Elephants rampage through Rayong fried-banana stall

The owner of a roadside stall in Rayong that sells kluay thod (fried bananas) arrived at work on Wednesday morning to find it destroyed and almost her entire stock of bananas pilfered.

People living nearby told her she was the victims of a gang of hungry elephants.

The neighbours had seen a herd of about 10 pachyderm perpetrators ransack the shop and gobble down nearly 200 kilograms of bananas.

Somjai Naphom, 45, could only fume amid the wreckage of her stall in front of Huay Thab Mon School in Moo 1 in Khao Chamao district’s Tambon Huay Thab Mon.

Somjai said she’d bought 200kg of banana to fry and sell and was left with only a few bunches.

Officials at adjoining Khao Chamao-Khao Wong National Park said they’d try to locate the elephant marauders and herd them deeper into the woods.

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Sunday, July 23, 2017

In Thailand, the dog attacked the elephants, injuring five people

In the Safari Park of Thailand on two elephants, barking was attacked by a dog. Scared animals ran from her, slipped on the ground and threw off four Chinese tourists along with a driver. The victims were taken to the hospital.

In Thailand on Phuket five people were injured riding on an elephant at the local Safari Park, reports the online edition of the Phuket News.

Family of Chinese tourists with two children accompanied by two drovers went for a walk. After 200 meters on the elephants barking was attacked by a dog. The animals got scared and ran away. Not holding the balance, they fell to the ground, throwing off tourists.

One driver received an injury to his back, all four travelers received severe bruises and cuts. The victims were taken to the hospital. The owner of the Park apologized to the tourists and promised to pay for the treatment.

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An elephant found dead, believed electrocuted, in banana orchard

A male elephant was found dead, believed to be electrocuted, in a banana orchard in Bo Rai district of Trat province on Thursday.

A team of police and forest officials who went to the banana orchard in Tambon Nong Bon found many fallen banana plants next to a dead elephant, aged between 10-15 years old.

They also found electric wire with its plastic cover peeled off, suggesting that the elephant might have been electrocuted.

The officials said they would have to wait for the arrival of a veterinarian to determine the real cause of the animal’s death.

It was reported that there are still 3-5 elephants foraging for food in the area.

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Saturday, July 15, 2017

Special forest taskforce urges DSI to probe alleged elephant cases

BANGKOK: -- Phaya Sua, the special forest crime suppression taskforce, has asked the Department of Special Investigation (DSI) to investigate two alleged cases involving illegal elephant export and identity switching.

Chaiwat Limlikitaksorn, the head of the taskforce, on Wednesday morning submitted the request to DSI chief Pol Colonel Paisit Wongmuang via DSI deputy spokesman Pol Maj Woranan Srilam.

In the first case, Chaiwat accused a famous elephant camp in Ayutthaya province of allegedly sending five female elephants to a temporary exhibition at a German zoo in 2006, although the elephants have not returned.

He said the camp had paid Bt6 million as collateral and renewed permits on a yearly basis. However, it has been more than 11 years since they were taken out of the country and the camp refused to let the Natural Resource and Environment Ministry confiscate the collateral money.

The unit also found that three of the elephants got pregnant and gave birth but the camp failed to inform the DNP, which was a breach of the permit, he said.

Chaiwat said that there might also be a case of bringing elephant semen from Thailand for artificial insemination, which could be regarded as the smuggle and illegal export of a protected animal and a violation of CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). He also alleged that the documents involved in transporting the elephants involved faulty declarations.

In the second case, the department found that two elephants, currently kept at Prachuap Khri Khan’s Hua Hin Tique, didn’t match the elephant identification cards’ description and DNA information and were suspected of being wild elephants being passed off as domesticated animals.

As the unit’s attempt to proceed with legal actions was met with the elephant camp owner’s threat of a protest at the Government House, Chaiwat urged the DSI to get involved in the case to file charges of having protected wildlife without permission, committing document forgery, threatening on-duty officers as well as lese majeste.

“The DNP’s power and workforce might not be enough to fight with the elephant camp owner who is an influential figure,” he said.

Woranan said he would pass the request regarding the two cases to the DSI Consumer Protection and Environment Case Office to see if it qualified for a DSI probe.

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Friday, July 07, 2017

Elephant camp owner faces lese majeste complaint

A lese majeste lawsuit was filed against the owner of elephant camp following an allegation that the owner negatively referred to the monarchy in a dispute with the National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department (DNP).

Phraya Sue taskforce chief Chaiwat Limlikhitaksorn yesterday filed a complaint with the Crime Suppression Division following a conflict with the DNP over the rules on transporting five elephants out of the country.

Chaiwat said the elephant camp asked permission from the DNP to transport five elephants to perform in a show in Europe in 2006 for one year.

However, it was later found that the camp did not return the elephants back to Thailand in time. The officers also found that the elephants might have been used for reproduction outside the country, which is illegal, so the DNP seized the Bt6 million deposit from the camp.

Chaiwat said the department addressed the issue at a press conference in February 24. He said he decided to file a complaint against the owner after he appeared at the event and referred to the monarchy in a bad way.

Crime Suppression Division Chief Pol Maj Gen Sutin Sappuang said he ordered investigators to question Chaiwat about the issue first before officers will accept this case.

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Trang’s working elephants tested for illegal classification

Ten elephants in Trang were tested on Monday as part of a programme aimed at preventing wild elephants from being misclassified as domestic so their tusks can be sold.

The illegal reclassification can also result in people being injured by wild elephants.

Veterinarians from the Surin-based National Institute of Elephant Research and Health Service and officials from other agencies conducted health checks on the 10 animals on the property of Suchat Buakerd in Bang Kung Moo 3 in Huai Yod district’s Tambon Bang Kung.

The elephants were treated for any ailments and blood was collected to be checked against a national pachyderm database.

The 10 elephants tested bring to 53 the number of elephants checked so far this year by the team in the southern province, home to 100 domesticated elephants.

Most of those animals, 70 per cent, are used to pull logs in timber operations within Trang, while the rest are employed in tourism and hauling rubber-tree timber in nearby provinces, said veterinarian Pattara Chuaplaivej, the institute’s director.

The checks are conducted annually in 11 southern provinces to prevent wild elephants being illegally identified as domesticated, thus curbing the ivory trade as well as elephant attacks on people and property.

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Sunday, June 18, 2017

Baby elephant trapped in deep hole rescued

A baby elephant trapped in a deep muddy hole inside Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary in Chanthaburi is given water after being rescued from the hole on Thursday.

CHANTHABURI ­ A baby elephant trapped in a deep, muddy hole was rescued after a forestry patrol team heard the jumbo crying loudly at Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary in Khao Khitchakut district's tambon Khlong Plu on Thursday.

The animal tried in vain to get free of the hole, but failed. The rescue team, using a gunnysack and a rope, took 50 minutes to pull it out.

The jumbo, weighing about 100kg and aged around one month, looked exhausted. The officials checked the animal’s health condition, gave it water and later let it walk toward its mother, anxiously waiting nearby.

During the rescue operation, the panicked mother was heard trumpeting not far away. The mother calmed down after the baby got free of the hole, officials said.

Vet Pattrapol Manee­on, of the National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department, said the hole was about 2m wide and 5m deep, according to Matichon Online.

The incident prompted department chief Thanya Nethithammakul to issue an urgent order asking all national parks and wildlife sanctuaries to survey areas prone to mudslides and flooding to prevent possible danger to tourists and wild animals.

There were reports that the hole had been dug by irrigation officials during a survey for the construction.

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Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Wild elephant kills domesticated elephant

SURAT THANI – A domesticated male elephant was found dead on Wednesday morning in a rubber plantation close to Tai Rom Yen National Park, apparently fatally gored by a wild bull elephant.

The 27 ­year ­old elephant had been taken there by his owner on Tuesday to haul rubber tree logs at the plantation on Plai Hon hill in tambon Ban Song of Wiang Sa district.

At the end of the day, he was chained to a tree for the night. On Wednesday morning the owner arrived back there and found the elephant was dead, with wounds that indicated he had been gored by an elephant's tusks.

Praphansak Chaipho, chief of Tai Rom Yen National Park, and police examined the body.
He said there were four or five wild elephants ranging the area for food on Tuesday night and it was likely they had attacked the chained elephant.

The national park covers three districts ­ Wiang Sa, Kanchanadit and Ban Na San. There are an estimated 60­70 wild elephants in the park. Two years ago, a 3­year­old wild elephant was killed in a fight with a large male.

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Baby elephant trapped in deep hole rescued

A baby elephant trapped in a deep muddy hole inside Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary in Chanthaburi is given water after being rescued from the hole on Thursday. (National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conversation Department photo)

CHANTHABURI - A baby elephant trapped in a deep, muddy hole was rescued after a forestry patrol team heard the jumbo crying loudly at Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary in Khao Khitchakut district's tambon Khlong Plu on Thursday.

The animal tried in vain to get free of the hole, but failed. The rescue team, using a gunnysack and a rope, took 50 minutes to pull it out.

The jumbo, weighing about 100kg and aged around one month, looked exhausted. The officials checked the animal’s health condition, gave it water and later let it walk toward its mother, anxiously waiting nearby.

During the rescue operation, the panicked mother was heard trumpeting not far away. The mother calmed down after the baby got free of the hole, officials said.

Vet Pattrapol Manee-on, of the National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department, said the hole was about 2m wide and 5m deep, according to Matichon Online.

The incident prompted department chief Thanya Nethithammakul to issue an urgent order asking all national parks and wildlife sanctuaries to survey areas prone to mudslides and flooding to prevent possible danger to tourists and wild animals.

There were reports that the hole had been dug by irrigation officials during a survey for the construction of a reservoir.

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Tuesday, June 06, 2017

Four injured when van hit elephant

Rescue workers help the injured out of the van after it hit a wild elephant in Non Dindaeng district, Buri Ram, early Saturday morning.

BURI RAM ­ Four people were injured when their van hit a wild elephant on a highway in Non Dindaeng district early Saturday morning.

Police found the passengers trapped in the rented Toyota van on Highway 348 (Buri Ram­Ta Phraya) in tambon Lam Nang Rong at about 5am. Rescue workers helped them out of the vehicle and sent them to Non Dindaeng Hospital. They were safe.

They were identified as driver Phumchai Srisawat, 47, Miss Marisa Patipat, 54, Mrs Mayuree Traipho, 52, and Mrs Pawicha Boonjan, 54. All are natives of Chanthaburi's Muang district.

One of the passengers said that they had hired the van driver from Chanthaburi for a merit­making trip in Mukdahan province. While the van was on the highway in the early hours of Saturday, a wild elephant suddenly emerged to cross the road at a close range. Local forestry officials were looking for an injured elephant to arrange for treatment.

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Saturday, June 03, 2017

Celebrities are flocking to a new elephant sanctuary in Thailand

For animal lovers, finding travel experiences that provide ethical ways of interacting with animals poses a problem. Many of the activities that were once thought to be harmless fun can actually be harmful to the animals.

A new elephant sanctuary in Thailand might offer a solution.

Phuket Elephant Sanctuary is a 30-acre park and the first shelter of its kind in the city that gives elephants that have worked in entertainment or other forms of labor the chance to retire. They can roam the grounds freely during the day and rest in large shelters at night, The Independent reported.

Several celebrities, including the band Coldplay and Aaron Paul of “Breaking Bad,” have made visits to the park, drawn in by its ethical practices.

British philanthropist and fashion executive, Louise Rogerson, started the sanctuary in 2015 after volunteering for several years with elephant projects in Thailand, according to the sanctuary’s website.

The first animals – including a 60-year-old female originally from a logging camp – arrived in August 2016, a according to The Phuket News. The sanctuary opened to visitors later that year.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Wild elephant flees injured after being struck by van

RAYONG: -- A wild elephant struck by a van transporting junior students along a Rayong road Friday morning might have been severely injured. It’s being tracked in Khao Wong National Park.

Police said the accident occurred at 6am on Kong Din Road in Klaeng district’s Tambon Kong Din.

Driver Witthaya Suwannarat, 25, was taking the students to Triam Suksa Na Yai Arm School in Chanthaburi, where he’s also a teacher.

He told police heavy rainfall obscured his view and he saw two elephants crossing the road too late to stop. He struck one of them in the hindquarters, briefly knocking it to its knees, but the animal rose again and fled into the adjacent national park.

Park chief Sophon Boonma said he would dispatch officials to track the elephant and attend to any injury.

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Brothers claim proof that Phuket camp has their stolen elephant

SURIN: -- After 14 years, two brothers who previously owned a female elephant named “Phang Yo” claim to have evidence of alleged elephant identity forgery and hope they can finally retrieve the animal from a Phuket-based elephant camp.

Phang Yo went missing in January 2003 when mahout Somsak Riang-ngern brought it to work at a Krabi-based elephant camp and tied it under a tree in a wooded area near the camp at night. The animal was gone in the morning.

Somsak and his elder brother Wan Riang-ngern earlier this year received a picture of an elephant with another name that was at the Phuket camp, which they recognized as Phang Yo, leading to their attempts to retrieve the animal. The elephant is believed to be about 50 years old.

The two brothers asked Tak officials for help to uncover evidence in Mae Ramad district suggesting the elephant, bearing the microchip number “121675455 A” and with an identity card describing scars on both hind legs, was indeed Phang Yo.

Wan also said the animal recognised him and his brother when they went to see it.

The brothers said the Phuket camp owner had turned down their previous request for the elephant to be returned, adding that unless the owner acquiesced in the face of the new evidence, they would file a police complaint for theft, receiving stolen assets and document forgery.

Thai-language media has previously reported that the Phuket camp owner had resisted returning the animal because it had been bought for Bt1.4 million.

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Friday, June 02, 2017

Experts call for legal approach to protection of elephants

The National Legislative Assembly (NLA) held a seminar to seek a more comprehensive legal approach to protect Thailand’s elephants on Tuesday.

Wallop Tangkananurak, chairman of the NLA committee tasked with following up on animal protection mechanisms, said the seminar was the first move in a planned wider-scale cooperation to achieve success in the protection of pachyderms.

At the seminar, NLA members, experts from the National Institute of Elephant Research and Health Service, the Wildlife Conservation Officer at the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums were invited to express their opinions and concerns on the elephant draft bill.

All speakers agreed that the priorities were the problem of street elephants and the threat from wild elephant to humans.

They urged the introduction of new laws to protect elephant-related businesses and mahouts, an overhaul of existing laws in order to comply with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, as well as the integration of relevant laws into a new elephant law that would ensure pachyderms continued to be known as Thailand’s national animal.

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Sunday, May 28, 2017

Baby elephant born at Pattaya’s Suan Nongnuch

After park staff had patiently waited and monitored 17-year-old pregnant elephant Pang Ploy for nearly a month, she finally gave birth to the park's 76th elephant at 6.30am. The happy event was recorded on video and a clip posted on Thai social media.

Plai Nammon –the fourth elephant born at the park in 40 years, was welcomed with a traditional blessing ritual performed by Wat Samakkheebanphot abbot Phra Khru Kasemkittisopon. The name Nammon means holy water.

Pang Ploy had mated with 35-year-old Plai Bird since July 6, 2015, and began to show signs of advanced pregnancy earlier this month.

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Sunday, May 21, 2017

Woman killed by wild elephants in Chachoengsao

CHACHOENGSAO: -- A woman was kicked and killed by wild elephants while she was tapping rubber trees in a plantation in Chachoengsao province on Tuesday, police said.

Rescuers managed to retrieve the body of Lamai Ngernprasert, 43, at 8pm after they sought help from troops to scare some 20 wild elephants away.

Police said the attack happened at 5pm inside the NY Rubber Company plantation in Moo 21 village in Tambon Tha Kradan of Chachoengsao’s Sanam Chaikhet district.

Lamai was a worker at the plantation.

Co-workers told police that they heard Lamai crying out for help and saw her surrounded by the elephants.

The authorities said the elephants came from the Khao Ang Rua Wildlife Sanctuary about five kilometres away.

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Thursday, May 11, 2017

Phuket elephant camp accused of refusing to return stolen elephant

An elephant camp in Phuket stands accused of refusing to return a female elephant that the Phuket Provincial Livestock Office (PPLO) confirmed on Friday belongs to another person.

Livestock officers checked the microchip on an elephant at the Amazing Bukit Elephant Camp on Chao Fa 69 Road in Chalong and confirmed that the animal is registered as “Yo” from Surin Province, and not called “Nampetch” as claimed by the elephant camp.

The officers confirmed that the microchip matches the registration documents for “Yo,”
who was stolen while working in Krabi province in 2003.

Surajit Witchuwan of the PPLO said, “We checked the microchip in the elephant and found it is for the elephant called “Yo.”

“In addition, a description of marks on Yo’s legs are the same as on this elephant at the Amazing Bukit Elephant Camp.

“Our part of the job is now done, it is now down to the police to resolve this matter,” he said.

However, the owner of the elephant camp has refused to return the elephant to its rightful owner, Chorp Reangngern, 58, whose relatives have now taken the matter to the Ombudsman’s office at Phuket Provincial Hall.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Thursday, May 04, 2017

Tourists Warned Of Aggressive Elephants At Khao Yai National Park

Security has been increased for tourists at Khao Yai National Park to safeguard them from wild elephants, as several aggressive male bulls are in heat for mating.

Park official Somchat Saeli, said on Friday that Plai Junior, a 20-30 year old male elephant that is in heat has roamed out of forest for three days now, and has been seen wandering around Thung Pong Kwang meadow near Sai Sorn reservorr in Nakhon Ratchasima’s Pak Chong district.

Park officials have been patrolling the road that cuts through the park in Prachin Buri and Nakhon Ratchasima to look for wild elephants and advise tourists on how to observe the wildlife safely.

Somchat said park officials have put up warning signs in Thai and English to advise tourists what to do if they encounter a wild elephant while driving. They should stop their car at least 300 metres away from the elephant and, if the animal moves towards them, they should slowly reverse the vehicle and pull over at a safe distance until the elephant goes away.

He said visitors must not use flash photography to take pictures, must not use the car horn or make any loud noises to spook the animal and they must keep the car engine running at all times.

If visitors encounter an elephant after dark, the driver must use low headlights, he said. If they find themselves surrounded by elephants, they must remain calm and try to find a route with fewer animals blocking their path and leave as fast as possible.

“You can observe the elephant’s mood easily. If it is in a good mood, it will shake its ears and its tail. If it is in a bad mood, its ears will not shake, its tail will point upward and its trunk will look stiff and still,” he said.

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UN woman killed by elephant after herd charges noisy bike

A woman refugee worker died after being kicked by an elephant while on her way home to celebrate Songkran on Friday.

Wansa Khiriarchadai, 26, an employee of the UNHCR shelter in Thasong Yang district in Tak, was attacked by the tusker while she rode on a motorcycle driven by her husband on the way to Mae Sot.

The husband, Boontham Chokthammakan, 31, told police that as they travelled along a road through Khun Khao Pawor National Park in Mae Ramat district, they encountered a herd of six elephants.

The elephants, startled by the sound of the motorcycle, then charged them. Boontham said he stopped and ran, but his wife, who ran in another direction, fell and was kicked by an elephant.

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Monday, May 01, 2017

New twist in Phuket elephant ownership battle

PHUKET: The battle for ownership rights of a female elephant at a Phuket safari camp has taken another twist with the camp now presenting to police a registration document for the same elephant, but with a different name.

The new registration document, presented by Amazing Bukit Safari Camp in Chalong to Ao Nang Police Deputy Chief Lt Col Winai Poonsawat yesterday (April 3) now names the elephant as “Srinuan”.

When initially defending its claim to the elephant, the camp’s owner presented registration documents showing the elephant’s name was “Nampetch”.

In short, the camp has now presented two sets of registration documents for the same elephant, with the same registration information, including the same microchip number – but for elephants with different names.

While the new registration document presented for “Srinuan” features all the same registration information as the documents initially presented for “Nampetch”, the camp has so far not offered any explanation for – or documentary evidence recognising – the name change.

However, the camp still maintains it bought the elephant for B1.4 million in February from Raewat Chernkaew, 54, from Trang province.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Khao Yai takes action against visitors who taunt elephant Please credit and share this article with others using this link:http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1226931/khao-yai-takes-action-against-visitors-who-taunt-elephant

Wild elephants are frequently seen on the roads leading to Khao Yai National Park. Khao Yai National Park has filed a police complaint against a car owner seen on video taunting a wild elephant into chasing his vehicle.

Park chief Kanchit Srinoppawan said on Tuesday that authorities had examined a video clip posted on the @togetherisone Facebook account on Monday and concluded that the Camry sedan driver in the footage had intentionally challenged an elephant walking on a park road to chase his car, just for fun.

A wild elephant approached the car, which stops to take a video in Khao Yai National Park. (Photo from @togetherisone Facebook account) "It can't run faster than my Camry," the driver says and laughs in the two ­minute video, as a woman in the car films an elephant coming towards them. "It never catches up with me," the driver said. "It's fun, it's fun."

The clip also shows the car stopping twice waiting for the elephant to come closer. It is not clear when it happened, The clip drew negative comments from viewers. Mr Kanchit said the park filed a complaint against the driver, based on the clip, at Moo Si Police Station in Pak Chong district of Nakhon Ratchasima on Tuesday.

To read the full article, click on the story title




Elephants on the Road in Thailand National Park

Elephants are portrayed as sweet and lovely, and maybe a bit clumsy. Perhaps this image is the result of the stories for children – like the “The Jungle Book” or “Dumbo”, where elephants where shown as friendly. The elephants in the zoo or circus are domesticated by trainers and zookeepers, and are quite peaceful. But make no mistake – an agitated elephant can be the most dangerous animal in the world.

Every year elephants are responsible for around 500 deaths. Many of the deaths caused by elephants are attributed to younger male elephants who are wild and more aggressive. As Caitlin O’Connell-Rodwell, a biologist at Stanford University said, “I do think that elephants are becoming more aggressive towards humans in very compressed areas where they are being shot at and harassed.”

Having a driving route through a park where elephants live is probably one of the factors that makes these creatures feel harassed. Also, during the mating season the male elephants may be stressed due to fighting and competition. That is why from time to time in the Khao Yai National Park in Thailand we can witness elephants attacking cars.

In such moment the best is to maintain a distance of at least 30 meters from the elephant, don’t honk the horn or make any noise and always keep the car engine on so as to turn back in time if the elephant walks closer. Easier said than done though… We can see what happens when such frightening encounter happens.

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Stick test 'shows elephants have rare level of self-understanding' and body awareness

ELEPHANTS have provided further evidence of their intelligence and self-awareness in an experiment involving a stick tied to a mat.

Researchers required Asian elephants to walk on to a mat, pick up a stick and pass it to an experimenter in exchange for a food reward.

In control conditions the sticks were loose, but for the experiment the sticks were tied to the mat - meaning the elephant's body weight prevented them passing the stick to the researcher unless they walked off the mat.

The University of Cambridge study found that elephants stepped off the mat on average 42 out of 48 times during the experiment, compared with three out of 48 during the control.

Researchers said this shows elephants are able to recognise their bodies as obstacles to success in problem-solving.

To read the full article, click on the story title

Sunday, April 30, 2017

University student teaches English and cares for abused elephants in Thailand

In August 2016, Olivia Soan travelled to Northern Thailand to undertake a two-week volunteer placement. She was supported by a £220 Individual Grant for Volunteering from the Jack Petchey Foundation, which helped to cover the individual costs of her volunteer work. She raised the rest of the £3000 herself, with 50% of the money going to the Future Sense Foundation, who she volunteered with.

The first week of her volunteer work took her to northern Thailand, in a hill tribe village school called Hak Mai Tai. Olivia and her team spent each morning renovating two of the big classrooms for the children in the upper school, which gave the students a welcoming learning space that they could feel proud of. In the afternoons, she taught English to two classes of children aged 7-8 and 9-10. Olivia recalled how enthusiastic and happy the children were to learn and how heart-warming the positivity of everyone in the village was. She said “I think the teaching, along with having a happy and colourful learning environment, encourages the children to go to school and build on their dreams for when they finish school.”

The second week of the trip was spent at an Elephant Nature Park. The 69 elephants currently being cared for there had been rescued from trades such as street begging, the circus, logging and riding, which had left many of the elephants there orphaned, blinded or disabled. Olivia helped with the general running of the sanctuary; cleaning the elephant’s paddocks, feeding them and bathing them. Olivia said that although it was hard work, “each day here was inspiring” and that “being nuzzled by the trunk of an inquisitor whilst you are [working] makes it all worthwhile.”

The work that Olivia carried out at the elephant nature park was vital, as the volunteer programme is what keeps the rehabilitation centre running through thanks to their funding and volunteer work.

Olivia said of her volunteer placement; “This project was an absolutely incredible experience. One of the biggest things that I learnt from this trip was to not take anything for granted, and appreciate everything I’ve got because there are many people in the world who are less fortunate than I am, but still with a great smile on their faces.”

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Tourists Warned Of Aggressive Elephants At Khao Yai National Park

Security has been increased for tourists at Khao Yai National Park to safeguard them from wild elephants, as several aggressive male bulls are in heat for mating.

Park official Somchat Saeli, said on Friday that Plai Junior, a 20-30 year old male elephant that is in heat has roamed out of forest for three days now, and has been seen wandering around Thung Pong Kwang meadow near Sai Sorn reservorr in Nakhon Ratchasima’s Pak Chong district.

Park officials have been patrolling the road that cuts through the park in Prachin Buri and Nakhon Ratchasima to look for wild elephants and advise tourists on how to observe the wildlife safely.

Somchat said park officials have put up warning signs in Thai and English to advise tourists what to do if they encounter a wild elephant while driving. They should stop their car at least 300 metres away from the elephant and, if the animal moves towards them, they should slowly reverse the vehicle and pull over at a safe distance until the elephant goes away.

He said visitors must not use flash photography to take pictures, must not use the car horn or make any loud noises to spook the animal and they must keep the car engine running at all times.

If visitors encounter an elephant after dark, the driver must use low headlights, he said. If they find themselves surrounded by elephants, they must remain calm and try to find a route with fewer animals blocking their path and leave as fast as possible.

“You can observe the elephant’s mood easily. If it is in a good mood, it will shake its ears and its tail. If it is in a bad mood, its ears will not shake, its tail will point upward and its trunk will look stiff and still,” he said.

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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Elephants soak passers-by ahead of boisterous Thai holiday

AYUTTHAYA, Thailand — Trained elephants sprayed motorists and passers-by with water in Thailand's old capital city of Ayutthaya on Tuesday to welcome in the Buddhist New Year, known as "Songkran."

The jumbos from an elephant camp in the old capital Ayutthaya were brought out to rake passing traffic, soak passengers in open vehicles and spray anyone foolish or brave enough to venture within range.

The holiday, the longest in the Thai calendar, starts later this week and runs officially for three days. Cities empty out as workers head home to see family and celebrate by cleansing images of the Buddha, washing the hands and feet of elders, and throwing water on each other in what is sometimes called the world's biggest water-fight.

The festival -- which is also celebrated in neighbouring Myanmar, Cambodia and Laos -- falls at the hottest time of the year, when temperatures often creep above 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit).

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Sunday, April 09, 2017

Elephant foundation in critical need of aid

The Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) says it may have to close if it does not receive financial support soon.

Secretary ­general Soraida Salwala said the FAE is a Thai ­registered foundation that has looked after the welfare of more than 4,600 elephants in Thailand for more than two decades. It is now facing its worst financial crunch in its history.

It is best known for producing an artificial leg for the wounded elephant Motala (above) in 2006, but it has helped countless elephants before and since.

"We need financial support from both the government and the private sector to survive," said Ms Soraida, who is also the founder.

She said the foundation, set up in 1993, has encountered financial problems for more than 11 years due to falling donations.

However, she said she has put in considerable effort to maintain a normal situation until she realised she had to reveal the truth about the foundation's financial difficulties to the public.

"We don't want to create any burden as people are suffering during the economic slowdown.
"But we need help, or we will have to close.''

Ms Soraida said she had earlier asked the government for assistance in setting up an elephant fund to support any foundation that is working with and helping elephants. Up until now, she has not yet heard any response, she added.

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Friday, April 07, 2017

Food Gatherer Stomped To Death By Elephants

CHACHOENGSAO -- A villager was trampled to death by wild elephants while collecting wild produce with a friend in dense forest near the Khao Ang Ruenai Wildlife Sanctuary in Sanam Chaikhet district on Monday afternoon, police said.

The incident occurred about 4.30pm, according to police.

While they were foraging in the forest a herd of wild elephants suddenly appeared and charged at them. They fled for their lives, but only one of them emerged alive from the forest. The survivor reported to the village headman that his friend was missing.

A search party comprising police, wildlife sanctuary officials and about 30 rescue volunteers walked 2-3 kilometres into the forest from Ban Nayao in tambon Tha Kradan.

After searching for more than an hour near the Khao Ang Ruenai Wildlife Sanctuary they found Chalee Sophakul, 45. He had been stomped to death by the elephants.

Chalee's body was taken out of the forest to Ban Nayao about 9pm.

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Thursday, March 23, 2017

Farm-raiding wild elephants moved to national park

One of the tranquilised wild elephants is prodded and pulled toward a large truck, which then carried him to Bang Lang National Park in Betong district of Yala, where he was released, in Narathiwat province on Monday.

NARATHIWAT -- Two wild elephants that have been raiding village crops for 5 months were finally moved to a national park in an 11 hour operation overnight involving 500 people.

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Phuket elephants DNA tested to curtail trafficking

Officials from the National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department (DNP) took DNA samples from 67 elephants yesterday, including those that perform at the Phuket FantaSea attraction in Kamala, as part of a drive to crackdown on elephants trafficked onto the island.

There are currently 222 elephants registered at 23 camps in Phuket, said Supot Praedpring, Director of the DNP regional office in Nakhon Sri Thammarat.

“Today we checked four elephant camps with 32 elephants all used by Phuket FantaSea as well as 20 elephants at Pang Chang Hai elephant camp, 13 elephants at Kalim elephant camp, and two elephants at Tritrang elephant camp,” Supot said.

The DNA tests are part of a five-day campaign that began yesterday  to confirm the identities of all registered elephants on the island, including those used at tourist attractions and jungle-trekking tours, he explained.

The DNP teams, assisted Department of Livestock and Department of Provincial Administration officials, are checking identification certificates and microchip implants.

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Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Thai your hand as an elephant rescuer... The rise of 'responsible' travel experiences - with no riding allowed

In the wake of the death last October of the Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the year of mourning has clipped the wings of Thailand’s beach party lovers, and the backpacker crowd are heading elsewhere.

Maybe Thailand should use this as a chance to promote some of its lesser-known attractions.

A glance at Trip Advisor finds the Lanta Animal Welfare Centre at number three in the top ten list of things to do - ahead of the Temple of the Emerald Buddha or Sukhothai Historical Park.

Here visitors get to interact with animals. However, they are not exotic animals - but cats and dogs.

Lanta rescues abandoned animals from all over Thailand and, to help pay for their rehabilitation, welcomes visitors who are given tours by volunteers.

Taking a dog for a run on the beach or cuddling up with cats (the centre has more than 50 cats and kittens) can make a holiday.

Visitors are also invited to help with daily tasks from grooming the animals to gardening.

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Sunday, March 19, 2017

Thai Elephant Day Celebrated on March 13

March 13 saw the celebration of the Thai Elephant Day, started 18 years ago to help spread awareness and promote preservation of the Asian elephant in Thailand.

Maesa elephant camp, among others held events and celebrated the Thai Elephant Day. Vice Governor of Chiang Mai, Prachuap Kanthiya, also hosted the event.

A Lanna ceremony, with elephant drawing and hill tribe displays were also found, along with a special exhibition about elephants in Chiang Mai Zoo.

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Saturday, March 18, 2017

Elephant protest in Bangkok cancelled

100 elephants in Bangkok on Monday to protest against an elephant identity investigation by wildlife protection authorities, saying they do not want to disrupt traffic. Laithongrien Meepan, owner of the of the Ayutthaya Elephant Palace, said he and other elephant keepers in other provinces would not rally at Government House on Monday, which is also National Elephant Day.

Government authorities earlier asked them not to rally in Bangkok as it would cause traffic chaos, he said on Saturday. However, the keepers are continuing to call for an investigation of Chaiwat Limlikhit-aksorn, who is leading a team from the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation to check the identities of pet elephants nationwide. Mr Laithongrien says the investigation amounts to an abuse of authority. Representatives of kraal owners have sent their complaints to the prime minister via the Interior Ministry and the Prime Minister's Office, he said.

Mr Laithongrien began mobilising opposition to the screening after three of his elephants were impounded on suspicion of false identification. The team headed by Chaiwat was preparing a case for legal action. It seized the three elephants -- aged 5, 9 and 27 years -- because checks of DNA samples taken last year did not match those taken two years previously.

Mr Laithongrien insisted the three elephants had been born in captivity and had not been taken in the wild. He accused the department of conducting substandard DNA testing after the lab determined the
the DNA from the animals did not match ID cards issued by the Interior Ministry.

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Polo Tourney Raises More Cash to Help Thailand Elephants

The thundering sound of running pachyderms has been reverberating around Anantara Riverside Bangkok Resort over the weekend signalling Thailand’s annual jumbo corporate social responsibility (CSR) event of the year,  the Anantara Resorts/ King’s Cup Elephant Polo tournament.

Held for the 15th year, the annual King’s Cup Elephant Polo tournament raises money to provide aid and assistance for wild and captive Thailand elephants, with more than US$1.3 million having been raised to date.

The opening on Friday, March 10, delivered a spectacle of seasoned elephant polo players including last year’s champions representing the event sponsor, King Power (Nattapong Pratumlee, Satid Wongkraso and Tom Claytor), the PWC All Blacks featuring international rugby players Olo Brown, Stu Wilson, and Charlie Richelman, and Casiliero Del Diablo, represented by Argentina’s finest polo players Agustin Kronhaus, Manuel Albizu, and Franck Constant.

Following a traditional Thai parade featuring the last of Thailand’s elephant spirit men (Kru Ba Yai), chanting Buddhist monks waving bundles of smouldering incense, and the prerequisite blessings and prayers, the event the elephants had been waiting for got underway… a free-flow fruit, grass, and vegetable buffet where there were no expectation of table manners.

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As wild elephant numbers increase, authorities warn of conflicts with farmers

MORE EFFORTS are being taken to encourage a harmonious relationship between wild elephants and people living in forest areas, as wild elephant numbers have increased by up to 10 per cent and threaten to intensify conflicts with farmers.

On Thai Elephant Day yesterday, National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department (DNP) deputy director-general Adisorn Noochdumrong said the number of wild elephants in Thailand was rising at a rate of between 7 and 10 per cent.

Adisorn said areas that had seen a steep increase in the wild elephant population were the western forest in the Thungyai Naresuan Wildlife Sanctuary and eastern forest in the Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai forest complex. In the eastern forest, the number of wild |elephants has been rising by up to 10 per cent.

“This is the outstanding outcome of our efforts to protect the |forest ecosystem and preserve the wild elephants, since we have worked on reintroducing wild elephants into the forest and building food sources for elephants,” Adisorn said.

However, the increased number of wild elephants means more competition over limited food sources in the forest and could mean wild elephants will invade farmland near the forest looking for food and coming into conflict with farmers.

Adisorn said that to address the problem, the department was taking measures to create more food sources for elephants and also working with local people to protect the elephants.

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Friday, March 17, 2017

Thailand Seizes Rhino Horns Worth $5 Million In Biggest Haul For Years

BANGKOK:  Thai customs have confiscated 21 rhino horns with an estimated value of nearly $5 million in the biggest such seizure in Thailand for years, officials said on Tuesday.

Thailand has become a major transit point for the trade in endangered species to other Asian countries.

The seizure of the nearly 50 kg (110 lb) of rhino horn came days after 300 kg of elephant ivory was impounded and a month after the discovery of almost 3 tonnes of pangolin scales destined for Laos.

"It's the biggest confiscation of rhino horns in 5 to 10 years," said Somkiat Soontornpitakkool, director of Thailand's Wild Fauna and Flora Protection division.

The rhino horns were found in luggage sent from Ethiopia to Thailand. Two Thai women who travelled from Vietnam and Cambodia to pick up the luggage ran off when it was subject to a random check, police said. Warrants are now out for their arrest.

Global trade in rhino horn is banned by a UN convention, but in some fast-growing Asian countries it is prized as an ingredient in traditional medicines to treat everything from fever to cancer.

It is estimated that only some 29,000 rhinos are left in the wild today compared to 500,000 at the start of the 20th century, according to the International Rhino Foundation.

Africa is home to 80 percent of the world's remaining rhinos.

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Team Mekhong Wins 15th King’s Cup Elephant Polo Tournament; Over THB 6m Raised

After four days of fun festivities on the bank of Bangkok’s Chao Phraya River, the 15th King’s Cup Elephant Polo Tournament wrapped up on Sunday, 12th March.

A total of 25 unemployed ex-street elephants took part in this year’s tournament, during which time they received full veterinary checks from the Zoological Parks Organisation of Thailand (under the patronage of His Majesty the King of Thailand) and the Department of Livestock Development. In addition, all elephants were given essential vitamins, food and care which are not available to them during their normal daily lives.

The tournament was introduced to Thailand in 2001 by Anantara Hotels, Resorts & Spas and is now one of the biggest charitable events in the Kingdom, raising funds for projects that better the lives of Thailand’s elephant population. THB 6 million was raised this year, taking the total raised to date to over THB 50 million (US$1,400,000).

Funds will be donated to various projects including the Positive Reinforcement Target Training programme for mahouts and vets, the Zoological Parks Organisation of Thailand which supports veterinary and educational projects to improve the year-round lives of the 300 elephants and mahouts in Ban Ta Klang, Surin Province where ex-street elephants face ongoing hardship.

Team Mekhong beat the King Power Team 10-11 to win the 2017 King's Cup Elephant Polo Tournament

Other significant benefits from the money raised by the tournament include: the ongoing Thai Elephant Therapy Project which has been underway since 2009 in conjunction with Chiang Mai University’s Department of Occupational Therapy, with future clinics to include children with Down’s syndrome and other conditions; a THB 500,000 gantry to help lame elephants stand donated to the Thai Elephant Conservation Centre (TECC); 4,000 trees planted in Hua Hin for elephant corridors to stop farmer/elephant conflicts; funding a conservation curriculum for schools to teach children the importance of conservation and protection of wild elephants in Thailand, and funding Asia’s first workshop to show traditional elephant trainers and camp owners the benefits of Positive Reinforcement Training for captive elephants.

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Thailand lays out buffet for elephants in national celebration

Five dozen elephants used their trunks on Monday to scoop up bananas, melons and pineapples from baskets at a special buffet laid on in Thailand's ancient capital of Ayutthaya to celebrate the national animal.

For centuries, elephants carried warriors into battle, took a key role in royal ceremonies and provided haulage for logging and other industries, in the absence of machines.

Today they are more likely to be part of tourist attractions - where the animals are often mistreated, however, say rights activists.

"We plan to reduce the exploitation of elephants as much as possible," said Laithongrien Meepan, the manager of the Elephant Kraal and Village in Ayutthaya, where the buffet took place on Thailand's Elephant Day.

At the event, a Buddhist monk sprinkled holy water on some of the elephants and their trainers. Spectators also watched a pair of the animals lock tusks to re-enact a scene from an ancient historic battle.

Laithongrien said nearly a third of the elephants at the event no longer gave rides to visitors, but were available to be petted, bathed and fed.

There are about 3,700 elephants left in the wild in Thailand and up to 4,000 domesticated animals, says British conservation organisation EleAid.

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Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Thailand seizes 422 pieces of smuggled elephant tusks

BANGKOK

Thai authorities have seized 422 pieces of elephant tusks and arrested a Gambian man suspected of smuggling the ivory, customs officials said Tuesday.

The cut-up tusks were hidden in a shipment listed as unprocessed gemstones, Customs Department Director-General Kulit Sombatsiri said. The parcel was examined because Malawi is regarded as high-risk for smuggled goods and because a seizure last year had involved Mozambique ivory that was similarly concealed.

Kulit said Friday's seizure of 330 kilograms (726 pounds) of smuggled ivory worth around $480,000 was the first in Thailand this year. Thai customs officials last year confiscated more than 1,200 kilograms (2,640 pounds) of ivory in nine separate cases.

Sainy Jagne, 41, of Gambia was arrested in Bangkok on Sunday when he attempted to pick up the contraband, Kulit said. He faces charges of violating customs and wildlife protection laws.

The customs official didn't say where the smuggled ivory was being sent or if other people were suspected of involvement. There is an almost total international ban on the trade in ivory.

Poachers have killed tens of thousands of African elephants for their tusks in recent years to meet demand for ivory in Asia, putting the species at great risk. Thailand is a major transit hub and destination for smuggled tusks, which are often carved into tourist trinkets and ornaments. The biggest demand comes from China.

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Tuesday, March 07, 2017

Elephant group attacks taskforce over DNA tests, seizures

THE AYUTTHAYA Elephant Palace & Royal Kraal plans to lead elephants from across the country to Bangkok on National Thai Elephant Day to demand that the Phaya Suea, or “Tiger King”, taskforce is disbanded.

Laithongrien Meephan, owner of the elephant palace and president of the Thai Elephant Club, said that if Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha ignored their demands on March 13, they would bring elephants to various sites across the country in protest

Laithongrien presided over a meeting of representatives from various elephant camps from across the country, which resolved to establish a club for “anti-corruption, animal rights protection, promotion for National Parks Department reform and the eradication of evil”.

Most of the participants were dissatisfied with the Phaya Suea team’s work, which included checking the state elephant DNA bank and the seizure of elephants whose characteristics did not match identification documents.

They claimed the department’s DNA checks had flaws, which they believed to have stemmed from a problem within the agency.

State agencies were urged to perform their own internal probes and reveal information about elephant DNA test results for the years 2014 and 2016 as well as data about the agency’s budget.

They also wanted authorities to check the accuracy of elephant identification documents. The group said they would ask Prayut to invoke Article 44 of the interim charter to enforce the demands.

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Sunday, March 05, 2017

Tourists hurt as bull elephant tries to mate with female

AYUTTHAYA - Three Japanese tourists and a mahout were hurt when a young bull elephant giving rides at a tourist attraction in Muang district tried suddenly to mate with a female on Tuesday.

The two terrified women passengers, and the mahout, fell from the animal's back to ground. A third tourist, who was taking photos nearby, was also injured.

The two Japanse were riding on a 20-year-old male elephant, known as Doraemon, with mahout Chainarong Phorkaew at the Ayothaya Elephant Village when the incident occurred around 11am.

Doraemon’s behaviour changed when it saw a young cow elephant, known as Wassana, walking nearby. He lunged quickly toward her and tried to mount her. She rejected his advances.

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Woman dies after being stomped by aggressive elephants in Kanchanaburi

A woman of Karen origin was killed by a herd of angry wild elephants on Tuesday in the jungle in Kanchanaburi after being unable to escape their attack.

The victim was only identified by her first name, Chama. Her husband, Pujo, recounted to the police how they crossed paths with a herd of 30 elephants when they were taking a drink at a pond in the jungle in Thong Phaphum District.

The couple were walking home after work at the tapioca plant where they were employed in the early evening.

They tried to run but encountered even more elephants as they tried to escape.

Pujo shared his story with the Deputy Chief of Thong Phaphum Police Station, Pol. Col. Sumit Boonyanit.

Though Pujo was uninjured, his wife was not so lucky. The animals stomped her until she was dead. The police retrieved Chama’s body from the jungle, reported Bangkok Post.

Over the last year, elephant attacks have become more common as the wild creatures search for food due to shortages in the jungles and their ever-decreasing natural habitats.

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Friday, March 03, 2017

Bản in : Thai amazing elephant shows to kick off next month

 Thailand’s Amazing Surin Elephant shows will be held in the northeastern province next month.

Surin provincial governor Atthaporn Singhawichai announced that the Amazing Surin Elephant shows, designed as one of the first tourism campaigns in Thailand, will showcase the province’s elephant-raising and indigenous identity as well as the way of life of the mahouts; a lifestyle which has been passed down in families over the centuries.

This year’s event will feature a homecoming for 300 elephants to Surin province, large tables of food for elephants, an occasion which may be viewed as the world’s biggest ”elephant buffet”, mock elephant hunting and other arena performances. A contest on floats laden with food for the elephants will be held on November 19, 2015.

There will be a parade of over 20 vehicles carrying food for the elephants including fruits and vegetables. The parade will start at 2 p.m. in front of Sirindhorn School to the Monument of Phraya Surin Phakdi Srinarong Jangwang. The homecoming-party buffet for the elephants will be held on November 20, 2015. The parade of more than 300 elephants will start at 8.00 a.m. from Surin Train Station Surin to the Monument of Phraya Surin Phakdi Srinarong Jangwang where worshipping rituals will be held. The elephant shows will be held on November 21-22, 2015, from 8.30 a.m. until 11.30 a.m. at Surin Elephant Show Field (one show per day).

The event is scheduled from November 13 until November 24. The performances on the central stage at Si Narong Stadium will start from 6 – 12 p.m. The Amazing Surin Elephant shows are an annual event held in association with the Thara Red Cross Fair.-VNA

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Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Excruciating moment tourist is sent flying through the air after getting on an elephant’s bad side in Thailand

Volunteer got more than she bargained for when she tried to clean elephant with a sponge, only to be launched into the air

THIS is the painful moment a woman was launched into the air by a seemingly gentle elephant.

The tourist learnt the hard way that elephants are not to be messed with after she was unceremoniously launched into the air by one.

Footage of the cringeworthy incident depicts the moment the woman started washing the elephant with a sponge while in a river in Thailand.

The peaceful elephant is calmly playing with the water with its trunk one moment, before it decides it doesn’t like being washed.

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Saturday, February 18, 2017

Wild elephant kills one villager, seriously injures another in Chanthaburi

Wild elephants from Ang Rue Nai wildlife sanctuary ransacked homes and plantations in Kaeng Hang Maeo district of Chanthaburi province and killed one villager before dawn today
Another villager was also seriously injured.

Villagers said a herd of wild elephants came out of the wildlife sanctuary for food in Tambon Khunsong ransacking homes and plantations of villagers.

One villager who went tapping rubber latex along with other neighbours at a rubber plantation was killed by a bull elephant.

He was later identified as Thongdang Tumnanork, 46.

His death was reported to his wife at home by other neighbours who were also working in the rubber plantations.

Alerted local authorities inspecting the scene found his dead body at the rubber plantation, while another tapping rubber a kilometre away was also injured by elephant from the same herd.

Forestry officials were searching for the herd in the bud to drive it back to the wildlife sanctuary

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Elephants in Ayutthaya undergo DNA tests

AYUTTHAYA, 27 December 2017 (NNT) - A special task force visited an elephant camp in Ayutthaya to prove whether two suspected elephants were legally obtained.

The mahouts and staff at the elephant camp, also known as the Royal Elephant Kraal & Village, initially refused to allow the task force to conduct DNA tests on two male elephants named Ko Phaya Phet and TG amid fears they would be taken away.

Chaiwat Limlikhit-aksorn, who led the special task force in this operation, said the animals were supposed to be in the custody of a responsible agency for an investigation to find out where they were from originally.

The elephant camp decided to move them to Ayutthaya before the investigation could be carried out. The camp owner, Romthongsai Meephan, confirmed both animals had been obtained lawfully.

She also showed documents issued by the Department of Provincial Administration to prove her innocence.

Romthingsai later allowed the blood tests to be conducted after hours of conversation with Deputy Director-General of the Department of Naitonal Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation and the President of Phra Kochasarn Foudantion, Laithonglian Meephan.

The blood samples taken from the elephants will be sent to three different labs to find out if they are related to other elephants elsewhere.

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Curious elephant approaches tourists' vehicles in Thailand

KHAO YAI NATIONAL PARK, Thailand, Jan. 3 (UPI) -- An elephant at a national park in Thailand was filmed approaching tourists' cars in an apparent attempt to say "hello" -- or find some snacks.

The video, filmed last year, shows an elephant walking down a road passing through Khao Yai National Park.

The elephant approaches vehicles filled with tourists and appears to be using its trunk in an attempt to get into one of the SUVs.

The filmer can be heard explaining the elephant appears to be trying to get some food that's apparently visible inside the vehicle.


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Friday, February 10, 2017

Wild elephants on rampage in Rayong

RAYONG -- A herd of wild elephants from Khao Chamao mountain raided a plantation in Khao Chamao district on Monday night, rooting up pineapples and tearing down rubber trees.

Wanpen Kwannet, 40, a villager of Moo 2 village in tambon Khao Noy, said she was woken up late last night by the noise of wild elephants approaching her 80-rai plantation, but did not dare to go out to take a look.

Early this morning, she found the elephants had uprooted and eaten her pineapples and trampled rubber trees, causing extensive damage.

Mrs Wanpen said her plantation had frequently been raided by the elephants. She informed the village chief, but the only thing he did was taking pictures of the destruction.

Somboon Teerabundhitkul, wildlife conservation director of the 2nd Conservation Administration Office, said that after receiving a report on the elephant attack he ordered officials of the Khao Ang Ruenai wildlife protection area to investigate and provide assistance to the victim.

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Most elephants in Thailand registered for DNA checks

More than 3,440 domesticated elephants – or almost 99 percent of the animals’ total documented population in the Thailand – have been registered for DNA checks to verify their identifies and origins.

The move is a renewed effort to recheck the country’s elephant population following the issuance of an order under Article 44 of the interim constitution last September, said Parks Department chief Thanya Netithammakul on Thursday.

The article, issued under the sweeping power afforded National Council for Peace and Order chief Prayut Chan-o-cha, requires concerned agencies to register the elephants for a fresh round of DNA checks, which would then be certified along with the animals’ identification documents.

Under the order, they must finish the work by March. It project aims to help close a loophole involving the illegal smuggling of wild elephants and those incorrectly registered as domesticated elephants. The problem is rampant and severely affects the country’s wildlife conservation efforts.

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Wednesday, February 01, 2017

Elephant electrocuted after straying from herd in Odisha

Rourkela (Odisha), Jan 25 (PTI) A female elephant was electrocuted today after coming in contact with a live wire while munching leaves in Bisra forest range in Sundargarh district, forest officials said.

The elephant, aged around nine years, had strayed from a herd of nine elephants and came in contact with high tension wire while munching leaves from a tree near Garda village.

The elephant apparently pulled a branch and the live wire attached to the tree also came down, electrocuting the jumbo, the officials said.

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Monday, January 30, 2017

Firecrackers scare away wild elephants from crop raiding in Chanthaburi

Farmers living in Kaeng Harng Maew wildlife sanctuary in Chanthaburi province scared away a herd of 50 wild elephants with firecrackers as the animals tried to raid their crops Friday night.
The thunderous sounds frightened and prevented the wild elephants from the crop raiding, and forced them to flee in various directions.

Unfortunately five of them fell into the muddy pond where they got stuck and unable to get out.

Farmers heard the shouting sounds of the five elephants early this morning, forcing them to alert sanctuary officials to come and rescue them.

Rescue team backed with a backhoe arrived at Village 5 of Tambon Paws in Kaeng Harng Maew district and began dredging a slope for the elephants to get out by themselves.

But as they got out, some turned to the backhoe in a bid to attack the driver.

With the experience of the driver in dealing with animals trapped in muddy ponds, he drove to confront the angry elephants and blew the horn loudly, scaring off the aggressive animals.

The five elephants later joined it’s herd and went back to their traditional home.

Officials said they believed that farmers fired gunshots, burst firecrackers and throwing ping pong bombs in order to prevent crop raiding by wild elephants.

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